Letter, George Stoff to Florence Stoff, Germany, May 8, 1945, Letter 2

Item

Title

Letter, George Stoff to Florence Stoff, Germany, May 8, 1945, Letter 2

Description

Letter, 6 Pages, Envelope

Contributor

Keene State College
Stoff Family

Coverage

Germany

Creator

George Stoff

Date

1945-05-08

Format

PDF

Identifier

https://commons.keene.edu/s/KSCArchive/item/9992

Language

ENG

Rights

http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/

Type

Text

Text

Cpl. Geo. Stoff 42050100
Co A 735 Ry OPN BN,
APO 350 c/o Postmaster
New York.

Mrs. Florence Stoff
3021 Avenue I
Brooklyn 10
New York.

-123-
Germany,
8 May 1945

Florence, Sweetheart:
I knew that you thrilled to the sound of the announcement no less than I did. I know your thoughts, hopes and wishes were directed in the same direction mine were. I knew you could envision my holding you in my arms, and smothering you with kisses. I knew all these things because I too am undergoing the same reactions. Yes, my darling, the Germans are licked – the European phase of the war is over. There only remains the yellow menace, and then for many, many years to come. Peace for our child, and for his child, and if sincerity of purpose is the tenor of the peacemakers perhaps peace for hundreds of years. This is worth fighting and struggling for, and you and I have done our part. No one knows what the future holds in store for us, and it may be that the army will see fit to muster out of my age, but whatever our lot we must continue to be patient. Let us rejoice that all has been well up to this point. I am optimistic about my chances, but you too have already noted that the army works in strange ways. Be of good cheer, I think the worst is behind us, and time will continue to adjust matters for us, and to our complete satisfaction. As soon I have definite information about my future I’ll advise, until then, darling, chins up and that big smile of Victory.

Strangely enough the news of the surrender and war’s end aroused little excitement or any great to-do among the men. We knew some of us are destined for further service in the Pacific, (I believe this will be the young men) some will stay here for a while as army of occupation, and others will be discharged. With this uncertainty overhanging so many men I guess there was little enthusiasm for celebrating. In addition there was nothing to celebrate with, and most everyone was thinking of home. It was easy for me to visualize that happy gleam in your eyes as you realize the chances for our reunion in the near future could be a certainty now.

In addition to all the wonderful war news I was also pleased with four letters from you dated April 23rd, 24th, 26th and 27th in addition to two V-Mails dated April 28th and 30th. The snaps of you and Jim really warmed the cackles of me heart. The little fellow is growing like a mushroom, but he seems a bit thin. His eyes are bright, his smile bespeaks his personality, and he’s getting tall. You look grand, and your charming smile sets me agog each time I look at your likeness. Keep it working overtime, honey, I’ll be back like a homing pigeon as soon as someone blows a whistle. There were no packages from you or anyone, and no other mail. Have no fear about the camera it will arrive okay, and in the meantime, I’m using a 120 I acquired from a fellow. Am trying to obtain some more films but suggest you send me either 116 or 120. I can use about 6 to 10 rolls, so send a few at a time but send them first class in an envelope. You may forward 8 oz. per week without a request.

You neglected to advise about you and Jim being down with colds, but I also omitted advising I was in Germany as of April 2nd, so I guess we’re even. In any event it was reassuring to learn that you are both well after a siege of minor ailments, and that you are both so happy about the news and the coming summer vacation. It may be that censorship of mail will cease soon so I can tell you more about interesting things, but it can all wait for a future date.

The description of your summer plan sounds mighty fine, and I have every hope you and Jim will have a good vacation. Do be careful of your words and actions around there, and keep your eyes open for a summer home for future purchase. That’s darn near a priority on my post-war plans list. I am interested in knowing on what date I wrote you about on Germany, and the day you received the letter. How close was I in judging the end of the war? It was my hope that the letter would arrive very close to the end. Did it?

I read [abbyey’s ?] note, and his latest romance sounds like he’s getting ready to become a Benedict. He’s a pretty good guy, and I know his attempts to assist you financially are done to his pure and unadulterated friendship for us, a bit unlike Al and Liesel. Thank goodness our steady income has eliminated the necessity to have recourse to borrowing money, but it’s good to know there are those who think of your welfare in my absence.

The weather has been ideal for the past few days, and as long as my films last I continue taking pictures. Scenes, friends, ports and incidental interesting features all prove photogenic, all I need now is a place to develop them. Even this problem may be solved in the very near future. I feel great, the pressure is off, and I’m hopeful. No doubt Bob will never see this place, but perhaps he’ll get a break in the Pacific. Luck is such a vital factor in this business that all one can hope for is just a little more than his share.

Under separate cover I sent you to-day’s issue of Stars and Stripes, and I wish you’d retain all copies I send you in the future. I knew my packages have been many since I arrived in Europe, and some of them even contained junk, but when we get our own home and a summer place I’m sure we’ll be able to use everything. I believe all that is in route to you at present is the hand carved mirror, two bundles containing brass ash trays, and a package with 2 Transportation Corps insignias. One for you and one for the folks. I have at present some souvenirs which I’ll send you as soon as I can find some wrapping paper. The usual junk but everything has a story attached? I ‘m almost afraid to ship a German helmet, but I do have a Nazi flag.

Did you ever dispose of the radio cabinet and mirror? Enclosed is the balance of my month’s pay (25.00) since we cannot spend any money here. I still have quite a bit left incase I can obtain some more perfume for you. I did not buy the Chanel # 5, but I have every hope that Joe’s package will contain some for you . Please advise names of those he sent you.

That’s all for to-night my pretty wife, so please kiss Jim for me, and I’ll kiss you in mind with all my love. My very best to everyone, and may the days fly until our reunion. Until to-morrow I continue to adore you. As ever,
George

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