Event Title

Presentation, "Who Lives in the Reserve? Social Relationships and Historical Change in a Residential Area of Kuala Koh People in Kelantan"

Presenter Information

Aya Kawai, Chiba University

Start Date

12-6-2014 10:45 AM

End Date

12-6-2014 12:00 PM

Description

ABSTRACT — As ‘Orang Asli’ is an administrative category, registered ethnic names are used in administrative processes while the boundaries of groups are obscure, and people often intermarry. This categorization is questioned when people articulate land rights grounded in “their” original habitation, especially in the cases of nomadic foragers. Endicott (1997) examined the history, interethnic relations, and subgroup dynamics of the Bateq, based on data obtained from 1971 to 1991. I will present what kind of people dwell in the Kuala Koh reserve and what kind of relationship links them, based on data from 2010 to 2012.

The Kuala Koh reserve was established for the Bateq at the upper reaches of the Lebir River (a tributary of the Kelantan) in the early 1990s. The population was about 200 persons. However, they often camped in the forest, and during my research, the reserve became uninhabited twice a year. I will explain social relationships and the historical shift of residential area. The Kuala Koh people do not have any particular original habitation nor history of unity as a group, but they are tied with kinship and have attachment to the riverine area.

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Jun 12th, 10:45 AM Jun 12th, 12:00 PM

Presentation, "Who Lives in the Reserve? Social Relationships and Historical Change in a Residential Area of Kuala Koh People in Kelantan"

ABSTRACT — As ‘Orang Asli’ is an administrative category, registered ethnic names are used in administrative processes while the boundaries of groups are obscure, and people often intermarry. This categorization is questioned when people articulate land rights grounded in “their” original habitation, especially in the cases of nomadic foragers. Endicott (1997) examined the history, interethnic relations, and subgroup dynamics of the Bateq, based on data obtained from 1971 to 1991. I will present what kind of people dwell in the Kuala Koh reserve and what kind of relationship links them, based on data from 2010 to 2012.

The Kuala Koh reserve was established for the Bateq at the upper reaches of the Lebir River (a tributary of the Kelantan) in the early 1990s. The population was about 200 persons. However, they often camped in the forest, and during my research, the reserve became uninhabited twice a year. I will explain social relationships and the historical shift of residential area. The Kuala Koh people do not have any particular original habitation nor history of unity as a group, but they are tied with kinship and have attachment to the riverine area.