Event Title

Presentation, "Violence, Non-Violence and Something in Between: Batek and Jahai Perceptions and Academic Stereotypes"

Start Date

12-6-2014 1:15 PM

End Date

12-6-2014 2:30 PM

Description

ABSTRACT – Scientific studies describe the Orang Asli of Peninsular Malaysia as non-violent peoples. It is irrefutable that most of these groups have probably never had an aggressive attitude. However, it should not be overlooked that what we could call the ‘non-violent strategy’ in small-scale societies, is probably one of the most effective responses to external threats and aggression, therefore representing a fundamental survival tool.

Based on research and fieldwork in Pahang and Kelantan States, this paper highlights Batek and Jahai representations, perceptions and reactions of/to violence (symbolic and non). I follow an emic approach throughout my analysis.

In light of the numerous challenges and threats –deriving both from the national and global outside world(s)– to Batek and Jahai concepts of well-being, the paper aims to reconsider the idea that the opposite of violence is, simply, non-violence, suggesting that there is a gray zone in between these categories, which academics have too often regarded as diametrically opposite.

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Jun 12th, 1:15 PM Jun 12th, 2:30 PM

Presentation, "Violence, Non-Violence and Something in Between: Batek and Jahai Perceptions and Academic Stereotypes"

ABSTRACT – Scientific studies describe the Orang Asli of Peninsular Malaysia as non-violent peoples. It is irrefutable that most of these groups have probably never had an aggressive attitude. However, it should not be overlooked that what we could call the ‘non-violent strategy’ in small-scale societies, is probably one of the most effective responses to external threats and aggression, therefore representing a fundamental survival tool.

Based on research and fieldwork in Pahang and Kelantan States, this paper highlights Batek and Jahai representations, perceptions and reactions of/to violence (symbolic and non). I follow an emic approach throughout my analysis.

In light of the numerous challenges and threats –deriving both from the national and global outside world(s)– to Batek and Jahai concepts of well-being, the paper aims to reconsider the idea that the opposite of violence is, simply, non-violence, suggesting that there is a gray zone in between these categories, which academics have too often regarded as diametrically opposite.