Event Title

Presentation, "Batek origins and the peopling of Southeast Asia"

Presenter Information

Kes Schroer, Dartmouth College

Start Date

11-6-2014 10:45 AM

End Date

11-6-2014 12:00 PM

Description

ABSTRACT — The Batek are hypothesized descendants of the earliest humans to occupy Southeast Asia between 60,000 and 80,000 years ago. An implication of this hypothesis – that the Batek represent one of the oldest continuous populations outside of Africa – has long motivated anthropological and ecological research, particularly in Taman Negara National Park. An alternative view holds that the Batek, among other (negrito) hunter-gatherer populations, are relatively recent derivations of the dispersal event that gave rise to modern Asians between 25,000 and 38,000 years ago. Genomic sequence data has the potential to test between these competing hypotheses because it can provide an estimate of gene flow between the two dispersal events. Here we present preliminary genomic sequence data from a 40-year-old lock of hair donated by a Batek man inhabiting Taman Negara National Park. Our findings will shed new insights on the “negrito hypothesis” for the early colonization of Southeast Asia

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Jun 11th, 10:45 AM Jun 11th, 12:00 PM

Presentation, "Batek origins and the peopling of Southeast Asia"

ABSTRACT — The Batek are hypothesized descendants of the earliest humans to occupy Southeast Asia between 60,000 and 80,000 years ago. An implication of this hypothesis – that the Batek represent one of the oldest continuous populations outside of Africa – has long motivated anthropological and ecological research, particularly in Taman Negara National Park. An alternative view holds that the Batek, among other (negrito) hunter-gatherer populations, are relatively recent derivations of the dispersal event that gave rise to modern Asians between 25,000 and 38,000 years ago. Genomic sequence data has the potential to test between these competing hypotheses because it can provide an estimate of gene flow between the two dispersal events. Here we present preliminary genomic sequence data from a 40-year-old lock of hair donated by a Batek man inhabiting Taman Negara National Park. Our findings will shed new insights on the “negrito hypothesis” for the early colonization of Southeast Asia