Authors

Document Type

Course Change

Publication Date

Fall 2008

Abstract

KEENE STATE COLLEGE 2008-2009 COURSE PROPOSAL FORM NOTE: Please review the Senate Curriculum Committee Guidelines for instructions on completing proposal form. (refer to pages 4 - 5 for proposal details) DATE OF SUBMISSION: 30 September 2008 SPONSORING PROGRAM AND CHAIR: Holocaust Studies, Paul Vincent, pvincent@keene.edu History, Gregory Knouff, gknouff@keene.edu PROPOSAL SPONSOR: Graham Warder, 8-2947, gwarder@keene.edu PROPOSED ACTION: Underline or boldface proposed changes. Course Addition Number Change Title Change Credit Change Description Change Prerequisite Change Course Deletion Course Replacement Other: CURRENT COURSE NUMBER, TITLE and DESCRIPTION: PROPOSED COURSE NUMBER and/or TITLE: Abbreviated Course Title, if necessary: HGS 373/HIST 373 Race, Disability, and Eugenics PROPOSED COURSE DESCRIPTION: HGS 373 An examination of the history of the nineteenth- and twentieth-century eugenics movement in the United States and Europe. Efforts to “improve” humanity by selectively controlling or eliminating individuals deemed socially undesirable because of race or disability will be investigated by exploring science, legislation, and popular culture. Cross-listed as HIST 373. Fall, odd years. HIST 373 An examination of the history of the nineteenth- and twentieth-century eugenics movement in the United States and Europe. Efforts to “improve” humanity by selectively controlling or eliminating individuals deemed socially undesirable because of race or disability will be investigated by exploring science, legislation, and popular culture. Cross-listed as HGS 373. Fall, odd years. HGS 373/HIST 373 Updated 18 April 2008 2 LEARNING OUTCOMES: History Learning Outcomes Students will have the opportunity to: • Become familiar with the ideological foundations of European and American scientific thinking during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. • Learn about the human costs of applying eugenics ideas in specific social policies. • Incorporate primary and secondary readings as they formulate their own historical interpretations. Holocaust and Genocide Studies Learning Outcomes Students will demonstrate: • An enhanced ability to explore and analyze the Holocaust through multiple disciplines and perspectives. • A better understanding of relevant ethical issues such as prejudice, discrimination, and racism. • A broadened ability to think critically, and write and speak effectively, about diverse issues related to genocide and the Holocaust. RATIONALE: Recognizing the importance of Rudolf Hess's claim that "National Socialism is applied biology," this course will examine the growth of physical anthropology in the late nineteenth century and analyze both the so-called science of eugenics and the application of its principles in American and European societies during the first half of the twentieth century. RESOURCES: The 4,500 volumes and ca. 300 videos currently in the Cohen Center for Holocaust Studies, coupled with the holdings of the Mason Library and its ability to supply interlibrary loan for otherwise unavailable materials, are sufficient to meet the needs for this course. Graham Warder, a tenure-track historian, will instruct this course. COSPONSORSHIP VOTES: History: Date__18 September 2008_____ For:____6_______ Against:____0_____ Abstain:___0______ Absent:___1_______ Holocaust Studies: Date 12 September 08 For:_____8_______ Against:____0______ Abstain:____0____ Absent:______0____

Source

Senate Curriculum Committee

Language

English

Publisher

Keene State College

HGS 373 and HIST 373

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