Title

II 321

Authors

Document Type

Course Change

Publication Date

Fall 2008

Abstract

KEENE STATE COLLEGE 2007-2008 COURSE PROPOSAL FORM DATE: March 26, 2008 SPONSORING PROGRAM AND CHAIR: Education Department, Dottie Bauer, chair, (8-2864), dbauer@keene.edu PROPOSAL SPONSOR: Tom Bassarear, (8-2306), tbassare@keene.edu TITLE SUMMARY: II 321 Opening to Other Ways of Knowing PROPOSED ACTION: Course Addition EXISTING (OLD) DATA: IIEDUC 399 Opening to Other Ways of Knowing (course is being offered under experimental number in 2008-09) Learn what it means that knowledge is constructed, not received; and explore non-Western ways of knowing and being. Using psychology, philosophy, history and anthropology to understand different concepts of reality, our examination of knowledge construction will include readings, movies, songs, poetry, meditation, guest speakers, and personal experiences in different ways of knowing. Prerequisite: 24 cr. in ISP PROPOSED (NEW) COURSE TITLE: II 321 Opening to Other Ways of Knowing (33 characters w. spaces) SHORT TITLE: Other Ways of Knowing PROPOSED (NEW) COURSE DESCRIPTION: Learn what it means that knowledge is constructed, not received; explore non-Western ways of knowing and being. Using psychology, philosophy, history, anthropology to understand different concepts of reality, our examination of knowledge construction will include readings, movies, songs, poetry, meditation, guest speakers, and personal experiences in different ways of knowing. (50 words) Fall, Spring Prerequisite: 24 credits in ISP, including ITW 101 and IQL 101 LEARNING OUTCOMES: Course Objectives: Students will gain knowledge of: 1. Western and non-Western models of learning and knowing 2. Western and non-Western approaches to stress reduction 3. Impact of Western and non-Western paradigms on the learner and learning process Learning Outcomes: By the end of the course, students will: 1. be able to describe different paradigms for learning 2. be able to actively advocate for how they learn best 3. be able to describe the consequences of the dominant paradigm for learning and knowing. 4. develop tools, including meditation, to help them learn more effectively and navigate through life with less stress. Interdisciplinary Outcomes - Cross disciplinary boundaries to reveal new patterns and connections that reframe knowledge o Students will examine how chaos theory applies to education Analyze the assumptions and actions of society from multiple perspectives. o Students will explore how dominant modes of knowing came to be in this society, e.g., the allopathic triumph over naturopathic models of medicine in the 19th and 20th century, and hearing how psychotherapists, physical therapists, teachers, and other professionals have found their practice much richer by embracing a paradigm that focuses on paying deeper attention to the patient/student, listening deeply to the patient, and suspending the need to find answers. Skills Outcomes – identify those skills that will be given primacy (helping students further develop) in your course. Under each skill you identify, identify your expectations. Primary Critical Thinking: o Through experiences, class discussions, presentations, and reflective writing, students will develop a critical eye with respect to all ideas. o Demonstrate the ability and willingness to approach a particular idea, problem, task, or goal from multiple perspectives o Ask sophisticated questions when engaging an idea, problem, task, or goal Critical Dialogue: o Over time, students will take more responsibility for facilitating and managing class discussions. o Demonstrate an awareness of the listener and the response of others to what is being said Secondary Creative Thinking: o Engage a problem, task, or goal with sustained effort over a period of time o Use multiple models or representations of ideas o Go beyond standard schema when investigating a problem o Solve unstructured problems o Express personal ideas, points of view, or feelings and bring those to a product Integrative Outcomes – identify the one(s) that you will be addressing in your course. Diversity: o Students will explore ways of knowing including those found in indigenous cultures and non-Western cultures. o recognize how differences shape approaches to identity, knowledge, and power. o apply diverse perspectives and experiences to develop disciplinary arguments. Global Issues: o Students will be able to critique contemporary education in the United States through exploring other ways of knowing. o critique a discipline through the lens of other cultural values. Rationale: This course is situated in the context of a growing movement in higher education called contemplative education which attempts to infuse learning with experiences of awareness and insight through contemplative practices including mediation. Many students enter college having accepted uncritically the dominant notion of learning as teacher-centered and subject-centered. They have lost that internal locus of control concerning their learning. By examining the dominant model of learning, exploring different ways of learning and knowing, students become more powerful learners. Robert Kegan has articulated five orders of mind. A goal of the course is for students to experience the upper two orders: self-authoring and self-transformational. Resources: Tom Bassarear will teach the course. He currently teaches in Mathematics and in Education. Existing library resources are adequate. Advisory Opinions: This course is specifically designed for the Integrative Studies Program as an interdisciplinary course.

Source

Senate Curriculum Committee

Language

English

Publisher

Keene State College

II 321

Share

COinS