Title

PE 344

Authors

Document Type

Course Change

Alternate Date

2007 - 2008

Abstract

KEENE STATE COLLEGE 2007-2008 COURSE PROPOSAL FORM DATE: October 12, 2007 SPONSORING PROGRAM AND CHAIR: Identify the department and chair. Include phone number and email address. Physical Education Donna Smyth, Dept. Chair 358-2808 dsmyth@keene.edu PROPOSAL SPONSOR: Identify the person(s) who should be contacted regarding the proposal. Include phone number and email address. This person is expected to attend Divisional and/or Senate Curriculum meetings to discuss the proposal. Dr. Beverly King 358-2803 bking@keene.edu TITLE SUMMARY: PE 344 Sports Nutrition PROPOSED ACTION: Underline proposed changes . Course Addition Number Change Title Change Credit Change Description Change Prerequisite Change Course Deletion Course Replacement Other: EXISTING (OLD) DATA: An introduction to Sports Nutrition, including the digestion, absorption, and assimilation of food nutrients; bioenergetics in training; optimal nutrition for sports and exercise; thermoregulation and fluid balance; body composition, weight control, and disordered eating. Prerequisites: CHEM 100 or CHEM 103, PE 201, PE Athletic Training option or permission of instructor. Spring PROPOSED (NEW) COURSE TITLE: NA PROPOSED (NEW) COURSE DESCRIPTION: An introduction to Sports Nutrition, including the digestion, absorption, and assimilation of food nutrients; bioenergetics in training; optimal nutrition for sports and exercise; thermoregulation and fluid balance; body composition, weight control, and disordered eating. Prerequisites: INCHEM 100 or INCHEM 103, PE 201, Athletic Training major or PE major or permission of instructor. Spring LEARNING OUTCOMES: Course Objectives and Learning Outcomes: As stated by National Athletic Trainers Association, 1999 ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION 1. Cognitive Domain a. Explains the distinction between body weight and body composition NUTRITIONAL ASPECTS 1. Cognitive Domain a. Describes personal health habits (hygiene, diet, nutrition, weight control, proper amount of sleep, effects of alcohol, tobacco, and drugs) and their role in preventing injury or illness and in maintaining a healthy lifestyle. b. Constructs methods to determine the recommended daily allowances (RDAs) of a healthy diet for athletes and others involved in physical activity. c. Describes the nutritional food pyramid and explains its use. d. Lists the primary organizations responsible for nutritional information. e. Explains the importance of good nutrition in enhancing performance and preventing injury and illness. f. Describes the common illnesses and injuries that are attributed to poor nutrition. g. Evaluates the energy and nutritional demands of specific activities and the nutritional demands placed on athletes and others involved in physical activity. h. Delineates the effects of poor dietary habits on bone loss, injury, and long term health. i. Applies the principles of nutrition, including the roles of fluids and electrolytes, vitamins, minerals, ergogenic aids, macronutrients, carbohydrates, protein, fat, and dietary supplements, as they relate to the dietary and nutritional needs of athletes and others involved in physical activity. j. Illustrates the physiological processes and time factors involved in the digestion, absorption, and assimilation of food, fluids, and nutritional supplements as they relate to the design and planning of pre- and post-activity meals, considering menu content, time scheduling, and the effect of tension and anxiety before activity. k. Paraphrases the prevailing misconceptions regarding the proper use of food, fluids, and nutritional supplements (common food fads and fallacies and strength or weight gain diets). l. Describes the advantages or disadvantages of supplementing nutrients in the athlete's diet. m. Describes the principles, advantages, and disadvantages of the ergogenic aids and dietary supplements used by athletes and others involved in physical activity, in an effort to improve performance. n. Recognizes the implications of FDA endorsement of nutritional products. o. Locates, obtains, and interprets scientific position papers describing healthy weight loss, fluid maintenance, disordered eating, nutritional ergogenic aids, diet supplements, and assessment of body composition in athletes and others involved in physical activity. p. Analyzes the principles of weight control, including body fat percentage, caloric requirements, effects of exercise, and fluid loss. q. Identifies the consequences of improper fluid replacement. r. Describes and applies the principle of caloric balance. s. Summarizes the proper use of food, fluids, and exercise in weight control to dispel the prevailing misconceptions regarding weight control diet fads and fallacies. t. Explains the guidelines for safe weight loss and weight gain. u. Describes the signs, symptoms, and physical consequences of disordered eating. v. Describes the differences between saturated, unsaturated, and polyunsaturated fats and the effects of each on diet, performance, health care, heart disease, diabetes, and cancer. w. Describes the signs, symptoms, and physiological effects of iron deficiency and anemia and identifies foods that enhance iron absorption and are high in iron. x. Demonstrates how to determine the recommended daily allowances and identifies common food sources of essential vitamins and minerals. 2. Psychomotor Domain a. Accesses and uses information regarding the principles of fluid and electrolyte replacement. b. Applies the principles of nutrition, including the roles of fluids and electrolytes, vitamins, minerals, and ergogenic aids, as they relate to the dietary and nutritional needs of athletes and others involved in physical activity. c. Designs a pre-participation meal. d. Includes the proper percentages of carbohydrates, protein, and fat in a diet based on age, gender, and type and level of physical activity. 3. Affective Domain a. Appreciates the role of proper nutrition in the health care of athletes and others involved in physical activity. b. Respects the various recognized position papers that discuss nutrition wellness. c. Appreciates the long-term effects of disordered eating, bone density loss, and secondary amenorrhea on the skeletal health of the physically active. d. Recognizes the need for and implements proper referral for eating disorders. PSYCHOSOCIAL INTERVENTION AND REFERRAL 1. Cognitive Domain a. Identifies the symptoms and clinical signs of common disordered eating (anorexia nervosa, bulimia) and the psychological and sociocultural factors associated with these disorders. RATIONALE: This course is required for Athletic Training majors. The prerequisite change would still allow PE majors to take the course, on a space available basis, as an elective. RESOURCES: For course proposals, include the name of the faculty member(s) who will be teaching this course, whether tenure-track, full-time, or adjunct. Indicate whether additional staffing, facilities, and/or equipment will be required. Also, consider the long-term impact of adding a course or altering a program. When a proposal has staffing, space or monetary implications, the VPAA must be consulted and his or her comments should be included in this section. Dr. Jeffrey Timmer What additional library resources will be required? Has the library been consulted to determine the adequacy of library holdings or to estimate the cost to improve these sufficiently? None at this time. ADVISORY OPINIONS: Not necessary. No other departments will be affected.

Source

Senate Curriculum Committee

Language

English

Publisher

Keene State College

PE 344

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