Authors

Document Type

Program

Publication Date

Spring 2008

Abstract

KEENE STATE COLLEGE 2007-2008 ACADEMIC PROGRAM PROPOSAL FORM DATE: Feb. 17, 2008 SPONSORING PROGRAM AND CHAIR: Identify the department and chair. Include phone number and email address. Brian Green, Sociology/Anthropology, 8-2519, bgreen@keene.edu PROPOSAL SPONSOR: Identify the person(s) who should be contacted regarding the proposal. Include phone number and email address. This person is expected to attend Divisional and/or Senate Curriculum meetings to discuss the proposal. James Stemp, 8-2902, jstemp@keene.edu TITLE SUMMARY: Anthropology Minor PROPOSED ACTION: Underline proposed changes. Program addition Change in requirements* Program redesign Program deletion Other: *Please note that changes pertaining to admission requirements for a major require approval of the Senate Academic Standards Committee. EXISTING (OLD) DATA: Insert the program information as it exists in the current KSC Catalog. You may copy the information electronically from the KSC Web page: http://www.keene.edu/catalog/mdc.cfm Anthropology Minor 20 credits This minor introduces the student to anthropology, the comparative and holistic study of people. It explores the biological, social, and cultural aspects of our species in the past, present, and future. Anthropology attempts to integrate knowledge of human beings and their activities at the highest and 2 most inclusive level. Anthropologists study the patterning of human behaviors, as well as the conditions under which they arise, persist, or disappear, in the belief that the knowledge gained from this perspective may be applied to the solution of problems of everyday life in different cultures. It provides global information and thinking skills critical to succeeding in the 21st century in business, research, teaching, advocacy, and public service. o ISANTH 110 Cultural Anthropology o ANTH 111 Archaeology and Physical Anthropology o ANTH 212 World Ethnography or ANTH 315 Women, Gender, and Culture or ANTH 316 Cultures of Southeast Asia o ANTH 413 Anthropological Thought o One 300- or 400-level ANTH electives PROPOSED (NEW) PROGRAM: Specify degree, major, option, specialization or minor as appropriate. Provide the proposed program in its entirety and as it would appear in the KSC Catalog. If this change affects other programs, please note all the places (page numbers in the current catalog) where this change must be made. Anthropology Minor 20 credits This minor introduces the student to anthropology, the comparative and holistic study of people. It explores the biological, social, and cultural aspects of our species in the past, present, and future. Anthropology attempts to integrate knowledge of human beings and their activities at the highest and most inclusive level. Anthropologists study the patterning of human behaviors, as well as the conditions under which they arise, persist, or disappear, in the belief that the knowledge gained from this perspective may be applied to the solution of problems of everyday life in different cultures. It provides global information and thinking skills critical to succeeding in the 21st century in business, research, teaching, advocacy, and public service. o ISANTH 110 Cultural Anthropology o ISANTH 111 Archaeology and Physical Anthropology o ANTH 212 World Ethnography or ANTH 315 Women, Gender, and Culture or ANTH 316 Cultures of Southeast Asia o ANTH 413 Anthropological Thought 3 o One 300- or 400-level ANTH electives PROGRAM OBJECTIVES AND /OR LEARNING OUTCOMES: Identify the knowledge and/or skills the student will have an opportunity to gain as a result of completing this program of study, or state knowledge and/or skills students will be expected to demonstrate by completion of this program of study. For more information, see Guidelines for Developing Program Objectives, Course Objectives, and Learning Outcomes: http://www.keene.edu/senate/proposals/help/Writing4.cfm . Objective: Apply an Anthropological perspective to social and cultural phenomena. Learning Outcomes: • After completion of introductory anthropology courses, students will be able to define anthropology and distinguish it from other disciplines in the social sciences. • Upon completion of introductory anthropology courses, students will demonstrate the ability to use anthropological concepts to understand important ways in which peoples and cultures in the world vary from each other and are similar. • Upon completion of the minor, students will be able to recognize the value of anthropology. • Upon completion of the minor, students will be able to demonstrate their understanding of the fundamental ways in which cultures are similar and different from each other. �� Upon completion of the minor, students will be able to demonstrate their awareness of basic theoretical explanations for cultural similarities and differences. • Upon completion of the minor, students will be able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of how to do cultural anthropological research. Objective: Apply an Anthropological perspective to human evolution. Learning Outcomes: • After completion of the introductory anthropology courses, students will demonstrate a basic understanding of the biological and cultural changes and adaptations that occurred in Homo sapiens sapiens and their primate precursors to form humankind as it now exists. Objective: Examine one's own life and values using these perspectives. Learning Outcome: • Introductory and advanced students will demonstrate the ability to think reflexively about their particular worldview(s) from a variety of perspectives so they can better understand their orientation to the world. Objective: To develop a basic understanding of ethnographic and archaeological methods. Learning Outcome: • Advanced students will demonstrate a rudimentary ability to collect and analyze ethnographic data. Or • Advanced students will demonstrate a basic understanding of how archaeological data are collected and analyzed. Objective: View social and cultural phenomena with an informed global and cross-cultural perspective. Learning Outcomes: • Students will be able to identify, interpret and compare diverse cultural beliefs and customs. 4 • Students will be able to challenge ethnocentric notions and practices that lead to gross inequalities of opportunity and treatment in social life. • Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of particular cultures, including non- Western cultures, as adaptive and meaningful systems. Objective: Understand the centrality of gender, race, class, and culture in different societies. Learning Outcomes: • Introductory students will demonstrate a recognition of the importance of global, multicultural, and gender-sensitive perspectives. • Students will be able to discuss the significance of race, class, gender, and culture as organizing concepts in anthropology. Objective: Understand and evaluate anthropological theory and research. Learning Outcomes: • Students will be able to apply theory to explicate cultural phenomena. RATIONALE: Explain why this change is being made. Address the connection with institutional mission, and/or department, program, and course objectives. With the continued decrease in students who matriculated prior to fall 2007, this course does not adequately serve the needs of the incoming students, the minor program, and ISP. By changing the ANTH 111 to ISANTH 111, this course will be able to satisfy ISP perspectives requirements thus providing students with a knowledge of human prehistory and development, highly appropriate for a liberal arts education. . This past year, the course was redesigned with this anticipated change to ISP in mind. Important components have been added including discussion of ethical issues for archaeologists and physical anthropologists (such as repatriation and indigenous peoples), a section on social justice (particularly the role of physical anthropologists and archaeologists in recognizing and proving genocide through exhumation of mass graves) and greater focus on the question of “race” when applied to human beings (can it be seen as something biological in the process of human evolution?). RESOURCES: Indicate whether additional staffing, facilities, and/or equipment will be required. Also, consider the long-term impact of adding a course or altering a program. When a proposal has staffing, space or monetary implications, the VPAA must be consulted and his or her comments should be included in this section. No additional staffing or resources are required. James Stemp will continue to teach this course as an ISANTH. 5 What additional library resources will be required? Has the library been consulted to determine the adequacy of library holdings or to estimate the cost to improve these sufficiently? No new resources are required. ADVISORY OPINIONS: List the names of affected departments and include department responses. Advisory opinions are required whenever a proposal affects the curricula of other programs. A proposal must list all affected departments. An Advisory Opinion must be solicited at least two weeks prior to delivery of the proposal to the DCC. Affected departments have two weeks to respond to the request for an Advisory Opinion. Responses should be attached to the proposal. In the event that affected departments do not respond, evidence of the request for an Advisory Opinion from non-respondents must be provided. (The electronic curriculum review process tracks votes, advisory opinions and comments as required at each stage of the review.) The only programs this may likely affect are Sociology and Social Science. Advisory Opinions are attached below: James, You can use this message as a letter of support from the department. The members of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology voted unanimously in support of converting Anth 111 to ISAnth 111 on Feb 5, 2008. We feel that this course meets the objectives of the Integrative Studies Program perspectives course model, and recommend that the proposal be approved by all curriculum review committees. Brian Green Chair, Sociology and Anthropology Social Science is good with the change.... Pete Stevenson Updated 28 October 2004.

Source

Senate Curriculum Committee

Language

English

Publisher

Keene State College

Anthropology Minor

Share

COinS