Title

II HGS 254

Authors

Document Type

Course Change

Publication Date

Fall 2008

Abstract

KEENE STATE COLLEGE 2008-2009 COURSE PROPOSAL FORM NOTE: Please review the Senate Curriculum Committee Guidelines for instructions on completing proposal form. (refer to pages 4 - 5 for proposal details) DATE OF SUBMISSION: 30 September 2008 SPONSORING PROGRAM AND CHAIR: Holocaust Studies: Paul Vincent Women’s Studies: Sara Hottinger PROPOSAL SPONSOR: Helen Frink hfrink@keene.edu; 8-2956 PROPOSED ACTION: Underline or boldface proposed changes. Course Addition Number Change Title Change Credit Change Description Change Prerequisite Change Course Deletion Course Replacement Other: Change to ISP interdisciplinary course CURRENT COURSE NUMBER, TITLE and DESCRIPTION: HOLO 254 Women and the Holocaust Explores gender in Central Europe in 1930s and 1940s, women's experiences under Nazi rule, in ghettos, camps, in antifascist resistance, and as Holocaust survivors. Examines connections between the Holocaust and present day manifestations of antisemitism, sexism, homophobia, and nationalism, masculinity, and feminism. Prerequisites: HOLO 252 or HIST 252 or WS 201. PROPOSED COURSE NUMBER and/or TITLE: IIHGS 254/IIWS 254 Women in the Holocaust PROPOSED COURSE DESCRIPTION: IIHGS 254 How did women’s Holocaust experiences differ from those of men? An interdisciplinary exploration of gender in Central European families, in ghettos, camps, and resistance, this course examines connections between the Holocaust and present day manifestations of antisemitism, sexism, homophobia, and nationalism. Readings drawn from history, women’s studies, and Holocaust memoirs. Cross-listed as IIWS 254. Occasionally. IIWS 254 How did women’s Holocaust experiences differ from those of men? An interdisciplinary exploration of gender in Central European families, in ghettos, camps, and resistance, this course examines connections between the Holocaust and present day manifestations of antisemitism, sexism, homophobia, and nationalism. Readings drawn from history, women’s studies, and Holocaust memoirs. Cross-listed as IIHGS 254. Occasionally. IIHGS/IIWS 254 Updated 18 April 2008 2 LEARNING OUTCOMES: To explore the historical dimensions of the Holocaust: who, what, where, when, and the how and why of anti-Semitism. To explore gender roles in Western and Eastern Europe: Jewish and non-Jewish women: education, family structure, professions, images and responsibilities, and the intersection of gender and religion. To understand the double jeopardy of Jewish women: gender and race, when faced with survival in ghettos and camps, and the “final solution.” To explore the experiences of women in the ghettos, in concentration camps, in the resistance and underground, as survivors and as partisans. To explore connections between Holocaust history and present-day manifestations of sexism, homophobia, discrimination, and nationalism. Interdisciplinary Outcomes Students will be able to: • cross disciplinary boundaries [in Women’s Studies and Holocaust and Genocide Studies] to reveal new patterns and connections that reframe knowledge. • examine national and international issues [such as race, gender, prejudice] through [feminist] economic, social and political lenses. Integrative Outcomes The following Integrative Outcomes apply to Women in the Holocaust: Diversity Students will be able to: • recognize how differences shape approaches to identity, knowledge, and power. Ethics Students will be able to: • identify the ethical issues within a discipline. Skills Outcomes 1. Reading: • Demonstrate the ability to summarize and identify key points (secondary) • Demonstrate an understanding and ability to relate discipline – or interdiscipline – specific information to theories presented in a course (primary) 2. Writing • Incorporate research appropriately (secondary) • Cultivate disciplinary and interdisciplinary expertise necessary to question sources, develop ideas, and offer interpretations (primary) • Develop complex positions or arguments through writing (primary) 3. Information literacy (secondary) • Utilize discipline-specific resources in order to find information • Evaluate sophistication of sources for potential information appropriate to task • Develop research (paper or project) using information appropriately 4. Critical Thinking • Demonstrate the ability and willingness to approach a particular idea, problem, task, or goal from multiple perspectives (primary) • Apply critical thinking to important ethical and societal issues and problems (primary) IIHGS/IIWS 254 Updated 18 April 2008 3 RATIONALE: The course and prefix are being changed for the proposed major in Holocaust and Genocide Studies, and to conform to ISP Interdisciplinary Outcomes. It will then be cross-listed as IIWS 254, applicable to the Women’s Studies Minor. The title is being changed (Women in, not and, the Holocaust) to underscore women’s involvement in the Holocaust. RESOURCES: Professor Helen Frink will continue to instruct this course. The resources of the Cohen Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies are adequate to support its continued teaching. COSPONSORSHIP VOTES (see also attachment): Holocaust Studies: Date 12 September 08 For:_____8_______ Against:____0______ Abstain:____0____ Absent:______0____ Women’s Studies: Date 17 September 08 For:_____6_______ Against:____0______ Abstain:____0____ Absent:______0____

Source

Senate Curriculum Committee

Language

English

Publisher

Keene State College

II HGS 254

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