Title

II ENG 270

Authors

Document Type

Course Change

Alternate Date

2007 - 2008

Abstract

KEENE STATE COLLEGE 2007-2008 COURSE PROPOSAL FORM DATE Rev of Oct 31, 2007 Submitted Oct 10, 2007 SPONSORING PROGRAM AND CHAIR English Department, William Stroup, Chair (wstroup@keene.edu), 8-2692 PROPOSAL SPONSOR William Stroup, Chair (wstroup@keene.edu), 8-2692 PROPOSED ACTION: Course Addition Number Change Title Change Credit Change Description Change Prerequisite Change Course Deletion Course Replacement EXISTING (OLD) DATA ENG 270 LITERATURE AND THE ENVIRONMENT This course introduces students to the traditions of environmental literature, making connections with the sciences and other arts. May explore a particular group of writers, genre, historical period, or bioregion. May be repeated once as topics change. Prerequisite: ITW 101. Annually. PROPOSED (NEW) COURSE (Page 120 in the 2007-08 Undergraduate and Graduate Catalog.) II ENG 270 LITERATURE AND THE ENVIRONMENT This interdisciplinary course introduces students to the traditions of environmental literature. Students will learn to think across the humanities, arts, and sciences. May explore a particular group of writers, genre, historical period, or bioregion. May be repeated once as topics change. Prerequisite: ITW 101. Annually. LEARNING OUTCOMES Students will be able to: Interdisciplinary Outcomes • cross disciplinary boundaries to reveal new patterns and connections that reframe knowledge. • analyze the assumptions and actions of society from multiple perspectives. Social and Environmental Engagement Integrative Outcomes: Students will be able to: • demonstrate a commitment to analyzing and solving social and environmental issues • articulate the interrelations of natural and social-cultural systems, and the ways in which human agency can both degrade and sustain the environment More Specific Integrative Outcomes Students will be able to: • learn to appreciate the changing perceptions and understanding of the environment though readings in natural history, nature writing, and environmental and science writing Writing Outcomes Skills Outcomes: • Use writing for inquiry, learning, thinking, and communicating • Understand writing as a process that requires sustained thought over time and permits writers to use later invention and re-thinking to revise their work • Control syntax, grammar, punctuation, and spelling Reading Outcomes • Use reading for inquiry, learning, thinking, and communicating • Analyze and evaluate the rhetorical features of peer and published texts (audience, thesis or main argument, quality of evidence, structure) • Understand the importance of reading in academic inquiry and research Critical Thinking Outcomes • Move beyond initial reactions an issue, topic, or idea toward a deeper understanding of the complexity of the issue • Examine an issue, topic, or idea within a broader context, (for example, where does this issue sit within a larger social, political, or historical framework?) • Examine an issue, topic, or idea from more than one perspective (for example, reading not just those authors who support the writer’s position or viewpoint) Information Literacy Outcomes • Integrate their own ideas with those of others • Practice appropriate means of documenting their work • Understand a writing assignment as a series of tasks, including finding, evaluating, analyzing, and synthesizing appropriate primary and secondary sources Other Course Outcomes: 1. Students will build on the experience reading in a body of literature in 200-level literature courses 2. Students will demonstrate their ability to read literature as a product of its historical and cultural moment 3. Students will demonstrate their ability to make interpretive claims that are informed by literary criticism, theory, or other outside or interdisciplinary contexts 4. Students will demonstrate their awareness of the critical debates about literature and the questions that arise (whether cultural, national, ethnic, or evaluative) in these critical and popular debates 5. Students will demonstrate their ability to contribute to an informed conversation about literature. 6. Students will demonstrate their ability to show how a text facilitates the making of meaning through close attention to the relationship between content and form. 7. Students will demonstrate their ability to identify and discuss traditional and innovative literary devices and style. 8. Students will demonstrate their ability to formulate a thesis; to organize, develop and sustain an argument supporting that thesis; and to revise, edit and proofread their work 9. Through the study of literature and ecology students will learn to think across the disciplines of literature, art, and ecological sciences. RATIONALE This 200-level course has been taught as an interdisciplinary course since it was added to the catalog. For example, in a team-taught version of this course in the Spring of 2007 on “Mountains and Literary Imagination” we had cultural historians and mathematitions visit the class to talk about the cultural history of specific landscapes about which students were reading poems and looking at paintings. Students also compared the representation of mountains in European and American painting with those from Asian cultures. In the Spring of 2006 the book order included both Wordsworth’s poetry and Tom Wessels’s modern classic of forest ecology Reading the Forested Landscape. This change makes this 200-level English course available as an II course in the Integrative Studies program and provides faculty with the opportunity to continue developing courses that invite interdisciplinary collaboration. RESOURCES Taught by Professors Stroup and Long, and perhaps others. No additional staff or resources will be necessary. No additional library resources are necessary. ADVISORY OPINIONS NA SIGNATURE PAGE 2007-2008 1. Sponsoring Program: _______English__________________ Chair: _______________________ For __11_ Against _0__ Abstain_0__ Absent _1__ Date __October 9, 2007___________ 2. Advisory Opinions: List the names of the affected departments and include department responses. None required. 3. School Curriculum Committee (or the ISPC ONLY for Course Proposals designated II): Comment: For ___ Against ___ Abstain ___ Absent ___ Chair: ________________________Date ________ 4. Dean: Comment: As a course that builds on the writing skills introduced in the Foundation course, this course will be capped at 28. Approved____ Not Approved____ Signature: _________ Date ________ 5. Senate Curriculum Committee: Comment: For ___ Against___ Abstain ___ Absent ___ Chair: __________________________Date _________ 6. Keene State College Senate: Passed ___ Failed ___ Information___ Signature: ____________________________ Date ________ 7. Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs: Passed ___ Failed ___ Information___ Signature: _____________________________Date ________ 8. President: Passed ___ Failed ___ Information___ Signature: ____________________________ Date ________

Source

Senate Curriculum Committee

Language

English

Publisher

Keene State College

II ENG 270

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