Authors

Document Type

Program Change, Course Change

Publication Date

Spring 2008

Abstract

i KEENE STATE COLLEGE Program Proposals, Course Proposals and related documentation for the Bachelor of Science degree with a major in SUSTAINABLE PRODUCT DESIGN AND INNOVATION Table of Contents Page 1. Bachelor of Science in Technology Studies - Program Deletion……………...…….…. 1 2. Signature Page - Program Deletion - Bachelor of Science in Technology Studies ….… 5 3. Bachelor of Science in Sustainable Product Design and Innovation (SPDI) - Program Addition with Advisory Opinions……………..…………………………….�� 7 4. Signature Page - Program Addition for the Bachelor of Science in SPDI .………….… 27 5. Minor in SPDI - Program Addition…………………………………………………...... 29 6. Signature Page - Program Addition for the Minor in SPDI………………………….… 33 7. Associate in Science (AS) in Technology Studies Program description change…….... 35 8. Signature Page Program description change for the AS in Technology Studies …..….. 43 9. Course Proposal Forms and Course Syllabi Course Change Summary Table ………………………………page ii and page………. 44 Course Changes in Prefix only 10. TDS 170 to SPDI 170…………………………………………………………... 45 11. TDS 294, 298 to SPDI 294, 298 …………………..……………………….…... 51 12. TDS 400 to SPDI 400………………………………………………���………... 53 Course Changes in Prefix with changes in course descriptions 13. TDS 110 to SPDI 110…………………………………………………………... 57 14. TDS 152 to SPDI 152 ………………………….…………………………… 63 15. TDS 252 to SPDI 252…………………………………………………………... 71 16. TDS 270 to SPDI 270…………………………………………………………... 77 17. TDS 352 to SPDI 352…………………………………………………………... 85 18. TDS 290, 490, 494, 495, 498 to SPDI 290, 490, 494, 495, 498 …..…………… 91 Course Deletions 19. TDS 101, 121, 153, 228, 253, 328 and 452 are being deleted and replaced…… 95 20. TDS 160 is being deleted and content restructured for an Integrative Studies/Interdisciplinary course ...…………………………………. 97 Course Additions 21. SPDI 121 ……………………………………………………………………… 99 22. SPDI 180 ………………………………���…………………………………… 107 23. SPDI 221 ………………………………………………………………���…… 113 24. SPDI 253 ……………………………………………………………………… 119 25. SPDI 280 ……………………………………………………………………… 127 26. MGT 446 ……………………………………………………………………… 131 27. Signature Page Course Proposal Forms and Course Syllabi …………………………. 137 KSC Appendices of existing Course Syllabi: Required and elective courses for the SPDI program: MGT 101, MGT 202(IQL), MGT 213, MGT 331, MGT 451, SAFE 204, IAART 103, & MATH 120 ii Course Change Summary BS in Sustainable Product Design and Innovation Program Proposal Course Course Addition Number Change Title Change Credit Change Description Change Pre-requisite Change Course Deletion Prefix Change TDS 170 X TDS 294 X TDS 298 X TDS 400 X TDS 110 X X TDS 152 X X X TDS 252 X X X TDS 270 X X TDS 352 X X TDS 290 X X TDS 490 X X TDS 494 X X TDS 495 X X TDS 498 X X TDS 101 X TDS 121 X TDS 153 X TDS 228 X TDS 253 X TDS 328 X TDS 452 X TDS 160 X SPDI 121 X SPDI 180 X SPDI 221 X SPDI 253 X SPDI 280 X MGT 446 X 1 KEENE STATE COLLEGE 2007-2008 ACADEMIC PROGRAM PROPOSAL FORM DATE: March 1, 2008 SPONSORING PROGRAM AND CHAIR: Identify the department and chair. Include phone number and email address. Technology, Design and Safety Department Chair: Larry McDonald Phone: 358-2976 Email: lmcdonal@keene.edu Department of Management Chair: John Pappalardo Phone: 358-2662 Email: jpappala@keene.edu PROPOSAL SPONSOR: Identify the person(s) who should be contacted regarding the proposal. Include phone number and email address. This person is expected to attend Divisional and/or Senate Curriculum meetings to discuss the proposal. Richard Foley Phone: 358-2893 Email: rfoley@keene.edu John Pappalardo Phone: 358-2662 Email: jpappala@keene.edu Charles Sheaff Phone: 358- 2887 Email: csheaff@keene.edu TITLE SUMMARY: Bachelor of Science in Technology Studies PROPOSED ACTION: Underline proposed changes. Program addition Change in requirements* Program redesign Program deletion Other: 2 *Please note that changes pertaining to admission requirements for a major require approval of the Senate Academic Standards Committee. EXISTING (OLD) DATA: Insert the program information as it exists in the current KSC Catalog. You may copy the information electronically from the KSC Web page: http://www.keene.edu/catalog/mdc.cfm The following information is from the current KSC catalogue and the Advising Program Planning Sheet. Technology Studies Bachelor of Science Designed for students interested in technical, scientific, supervisory, and/or managerial areas of industry. Laboratory-based instruction is used to reinforce theoretical concepts. The program’s flexible design allows students to customize a program to meet their career needs in CAD-CAM or product design. Graduates typically assume positions in planning, supply, production, quality control, product design/engineering/evaluation, technical services, marketing, and sales. INTEGRATIVE STUDIES REQUIREMENTS 44 credits minimum PRODUCT DESIGN and DEVELOPMENT REQUIREMENTS 40 credits Product Design and Development Foundation 16 credits o TDS 101 Manufacturing Processes o TDS 110 Electricity and Electronic Fundamentals o TDS 152 Product Design I o TDS 170 Introduction to Woodworking Technology Product Design and Development Specialty 12 credits o TDS 153 Machine Tool Process o TDS 252 Product Design II o TDS 352 Product Design III Product Design and Development Electives 3 8 credits o Select at least two from the following: o TDS 121 Drafting and Design Fundamentals o TDS 228 Computer Aided Drafting o TDS 253 Materials of Manufacturing o TDS 270 Woodworking Processes o TDS 290 Special Topics (1-4 credits) o TDS 298 Independent Study (1-4 credits) o TDS 328 Three-Dimensional CAD o TDS 452 Product Design IV o TDS 490 Advanced Special Topics (1-4 credits) o TDS 498 Independent Study Product Design and Development Capstone 4 credits o TDS 400 Manufacturing Enterprise ELECTIVES Select courses to reach a total of 124 credits for the degree. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 124 credits 4 TECHNOLOGY STUDIES: Product Design ‐ B.S. (124 cr) Keene State College 2007‐2008 Catalog INTEGRATIVE STUDIES PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS (44 cr) Note: Students must complete the Thinking & Writing requirement within their first two semesters and the Quantitative Literacy requirement within their first three semesters. Foundations ITW: Thinking & Writing □ __________________________________________________________________ IQL: Quantitative Literacy □ __________________________________________________________________ Perspectives NOTE: Students may take only one course in any specific discipline within the PERSPECTIVES area. Disciplines are shown in BOLD, such as IAART. IA: Arts – IAART, IAMU, IATAD 1 course: □ __________________________________________ IH: Humanities ‐ IHCOMM, IHENG, IHFILM, IHFR, IHGER, IHHIST, IHJRN, IHML, IHPHIL, IHSP 2 courses: □ _______________________________________□ __________________________________________ IA/IH: 1 additional course in either IA or IH 1 course: □ ________________________________________ IN: Natural Sciences – INASTR, INBIO, INCHEM, INGEOL, INMET, INPHYS 2 courses: □ ________________________________________□ ________________________________________ IS: Social Sciences – ISANTH, ISCJS, ISECON, ISGEOG, ISPOSC, ISPSYC, ISSOC, ISSOSC 2 courses: □ ________________________________________□ ________________________________________ Interdisciplinary II: Any course beginning with II 1 course: □ ________________________________________ NOTE: Courses fulfilling PERSPECTIVES and INTERDISCIPLINARY requirements may be at the 100‐400 level. All students must complete a minimum of 28 credits at the 100‐200 level and a minimum of 8 credits at the 300‐400 level to complete the Integrative Studies Program (ISP). ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ MAJOR REQUIREMENTS (40 cr) Product Design and Development Foundation: (16 cr) □ TDS 101 Manufacturing Processes □ TDS 152 Product Design I □ TDS 110 Electricity & Electronic Fundamentals □ TDS 170 Intro to Woodworking Technology Product Design and Development Specialty: (12 cr) □ TDS 153 Machine Tool Process □ TDS 352 Product Design III □ TDS 252 Product Design II Product Design and Development Electives: (8 cr) Select at least two from the following: □ TDS 121 Drafting & Design Fundamentals □ TDS 298 Independent Study (1‐4 cr) □ TDS 228 Computer Aided Drafting □ TDS 328 Three‐Dimensional CAD □ TDS 253 Materials of Manufacturing □ TDS 452 Product Design IV □ TDS 270 Woodworking Processes □ TDS 490 Advanced Special Topics (1‐4 cr) □ TDS 290 Special Topics (1‐4 cr) □ TDS 498 Independent Study Product Design and Development Capstone: (4 cr) □ TDS 400 Manufacturing Enterprise Note: Please see the catalog for COMPLETE program requirements. This sheet is for general advising purposes only. 5 SIGNATURE PAGE 2007-2008 1. Sponsoring Program: Technology, Design, and Safety Department for Deleting the Bachelor of Science Technology Studies major Chair Signature: _______________________ For _7_ Against _0__ Abstain__0_ Absent _1__ Date _2-29-2008____________ 2. Advisory Opinions: List the names of the affected departments and include department responses. Not needed 3. School Curriculum Committee (or the ISPC ONLY for Course Proposals designated II): Comment: For ___ Against ___ Abstain ___ Absent ___ Chair: ________________________Date ________ 4. Dean: Comment: Approved____ Not Approved____ Signature: _________ Date ________ 5. Senate Curriculum Committee: Comment: For ___ Against___ Abstain ___ Absent ___ Chair: __________________________Date _________ 6. Keene State College Senate: Passed ___ Failed ___ Information___ Signature: ____________________________ Date ________ 7. Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs: Passed ___ Failed ___ Information___ Signature: _____________________________Date ________ 8. President: Passed ___ Failed ___ Information___ Signature: ____________________________ Date ________ 6 7 KEENE STATE COLLEGE 2007-2008 ACADEMIC PROGRAM PROPOSAL FORM DATE: March 1, 2008 SPONSORING PROGRAM AND CHAIR: Identify the department and chair. Include phone number and email address. Technology, Design and Safety Department Chair: Larry McDonald Phone: 358-2976 Email: lmcdonal@keene.edu Department of Management Chair: John Pappalardo Phone: 358-2662 Email: jpappala@keene.edu PROPOSAL SPONSOR: Identify the person(s) who should be contacted regarding the proposal. Include phone number and email address. This person is expected to attend Divisional and/or Senate Curriculum meetings to discuss the proposal. Richard Foley Phone: 358-2893 Email: rfoley@keene.edu John Pappalardo Phone: 358-2662 Email: jpappala@keene.edu Charles Sheaff Phone: 358- 2887 Email: csheaff@keene.edu TITLE SUMMARY: Bachelor of Science in Sustainable Product Design and Innovation PROPOSED ACTION: Underline proposed changes. Program addition Change in requirements* Program redesign Program deletion Other: 8 PROPOSED (NEW) PROGRAM: Specify degree, major, option, specialization or minor as appropriate. Provide the proposed program in its entirety and as it would appear in the KSC Catalog. If this change affects other programs, please note all the places (page numbers in the current catalog) where this change must be made. Keene State College Catalog information SUSTAINABLE PRODUCT DESIGN AND INNOVATION Bachelor of Science The Sustainable Product Design and Innovation major at Keene State College is a pre-professional four-year program offering a cross-disciplinary curriculum to give the student a solid foundation in the artistic, scientific, and technical aspects of product design and the social and scientific aspects of sustainability concerns. Product Design involves the synthesis of consumer needs and production capabilities in the creation of new products and their affiliated services. The integrated sustainability issues link the multitude of human factors, environmental and resource depletion concerns to the decision making process. The curriculum draws from five disciplines, art, management, mathematics, safety and industrial/product design to build the student’s capacity in design theory and practice, material sciences, production processes, digital technology, and the quantitative and qualitative issues of sustainability and business practices. The Sustainable Product Design and Innovation major is designed to provide students with a hands-on project based learning curriculum focusing on real world applications grounded in a liberal arts foundation. The emphasis on innovation complimented with business management encourages creative problem solving and entrepreneurship providing students with the tools to adapt and evolve their career paths to meet the needs of a rapidly changing world. Integrated sustainability values prepare students for engagement in the product realization arena in the “lean” and “green” global production economy. Graduates are prepared to pursue graduate study or transition directly into careers in product design/engineering, technology/evaluation, planning, supply, production, quality control, technical services, marketing, and sales or other related professions. INTEGRATIVE STUDIES REQUIREMENTS 44 credits minimum SUSTAINABLE PRODUCT DESIGN AND INNOVATION Major (64 total Credits: 56 credits + 8 credits applicable to Integrative Studies) SPDI CORE COURSES: (28 credits) SPDI 110 Electricity & Electronics Fundamentals SPDI 152 Product Design I SPDI 180 Metal Processes & Prototyping SPDI 252 Product Design II SPDI 253 Materials - A Life Cycle View SPDI 221 Three - Dimensional CADD SPDI 352 Product Design III 9 MANAGEMENT CORE COURSES: (12 credits + 4 credits in Integrative studies*) MGT 101 Introduction to Management MGT 202 Quantitative Decision Making * (Course may be used to satisfy an IQL Integrative Studies Program requirement) MGT 213 Financial Accounting ONE OF THE TWO FOLLOWING COURSES: MGT 331 Principles of Marketing MGT 446 Competitive Manufacturing Mgt SPDI/MGT ELECTIVES: (Select 4 credits from the following courses) SPDI 121 Drafting, Sketching and CADD SPDI 170 Intro. to Woodworking Tech. SPDI 270 Woodworking Processes SPDI 280 CAD/CAM - using MasterCAM MGT 451 Social, Legal, and Political Environment of Business SPDI 290 Special Topics SPDI 298 Independent Study SPDI 490 Advanced Special Topics SPDI 495 Seminar SPDI 498 Independent Study REQUIRED ALLIED DISCIPLINE COURSES: (8 credits + 4 credits Integrative Studies*) IA ART103 Three Dimensional Design* SAFE 204 Human Factors in Safety MATH course, Select at least ONE of the following: MATH 120 Applied Algebra & Trigonometry MATH 130 Precalculus MATH 151 Calculus I SPDI CAPSTONE COURSE: (4 credits) SPDI 400 Manufacturing Enterprise Internships and/or Cooperative Education Experiences are recommended: SPDI 294 Cooperative Education (count towards open elective credit) SPDI 494 Advanced Cooperative Education (count towards open elective credit) OPEN ELECTIVES Select additional courses of your choice to bring total number of credits earned to 124. Students are encouraged to complete a minor or an organized cluster of courses related to their career interests. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS (124 credits) 10 PROGRAM OBJECTIVES AND /OR LEARNING OUTCOMES: Identify the knowledge and/or skills the student will have an opportunity to gain as a result of completing this program of study, or state knowledge and/or skills students will be expected to demonstrate by completion of this program of study. Description of the Program Learning Outcomes: Knowledge/Skills/Dispositions Knowledge: upon completion of the Sustainable Product Design and Innovation (SPDI) major students will understand: • Basic product design principles, processes and ideation methodologies. • The relationship between human factors, technical and functional aspects and aesthetics, social, cultural and historical factors, in synthesizing design solutions. • A basic working knowledge of the composition, behavior, properties and characteristics of materials used to manufacture products. • A basic working knowledge of the manufacturing processes available to create products including processes for metals, plastics, wood, electronics, and composites. • Fundamentals of the human factors and ergonomics involved in product design. • The science and practice of sustainable design and industrial ecology. • The science and practice of “just-in-time” and lean manufacturing. • Basics of industrial design practice concerning internal and customer relations, regulatory factors, manufacturing environments, profitability and intellectual property. • Methods for achieving organizational and operational goals and the characteristics of successful leadership. • Basic accounting concepts and their application in managerial decisions involving sustainability issues and understanding real internal and external costs. Skills: upon completion of the SPDI major students will be able to: • Synthesize design, human factors and consumer behavioral research into design requirements, design concepts through to working prototypes in innovative design solutions to meet the needs of consumers. • Apply human factors, form, materials and manufacturing processes in product design decisions. • Manage new design projects through the design process from ideation through to prototyping and production phase-in documentation and costing. • Investigate materials and fabrication systems for their designs. • Analyze, research, and question the influence of common consumer in a social, cultural, and political context. • Frontload and otherwise continuously apply the principles (qualitative and quantitative) of sustainable design to specific product design solutions. • Analyze simple structural and material problems and communicate with mechanical engineers. • Collaborate and communicate with colleagues, clients, and others. • Employ state of the art digital technology to communicate design ideas and solutions. 11 • Employ model making and prototyping technologies and interface with machine tools. • Apply basic statistical and quantitative research methods in marketing or manufacturing operations settings including ethical and realistic costing in make-buy evaluations. Values/Dispositions: upon completion of the program students will be disposed to: • Promote the value of the aesthetics of form and function in our society. • Promote realistic creative solutions to product design and manufacturing challenges based on hands-on experiences and research capabilities. • Employ and promote principles and practices of environmentally sustainable design in product design, manufacturing processes and their daily lives. • Promote the responsibility of the producer to ethical practices in the production supply chain of materials, parts and products. • Embrace teamwork and collaboration in all settings. • Use scientific information related to human health and the environment to formulate the appropriate questions and research solutions to improve sustainability and ecological performance of products. • Use innovation and sound business practices in entrepreneurial and intrapreneurial (within an organization) initiatives. 12 RATIONALE: Explain why this change is being made. Address the connection with institutional mission, and/or department, program, and course objectives. Alignment with the College Mission The “Mission” of Keene State College as stated in the 2007-2008 undergraduate and graduate catalog is: “to provide and maintain an intellectual environment grounded in the liberal arts that fosters both the personal and professional growth of our students. In support of this mission the College promotes and sustains strong relationships among students, faculty, and staff that emphasize creative and critical thinking, scholarship and research, and a passion for learning. Through a mature commitment to learning and service, students will be able to integrate different forms of scholarship and will graduate with substantive knowledge in a chosen field of study. Through the retention and support of a caring staff and a faculty of effective teachers and active scholars, the College prepares students for success in a complex, interdependent world.” The “Campus Values” of Keene State College as stated in the 2007-2008 undergraduate and graduate catalog include these selected entries that reflect the goals of the SPDI program: As a campus community, we value: • Excellence in teaching, learning, and scholarship • Creativity and intellectual curiosity • Environmental stewardship and sustainability • Cultural enrichment • Service to the community The TDS and MGT faculty recognize that the relentless pressures of pollution, environmental degradation, and depletion of finite resources impact our collective consciousness and threaten the world’s economic and social systems. It is a moral imperative that we, as educators, explore interdisciplinary solutions based on contributions from a range of professions — geopolitical, sociological, technological, and engineering. Recent examples of higher education’s commitment to sustainability include acceptance of a new interdisciplinary discipline, Environmental Science; the development of “Safety” programs to meet the needs of an emergent Environmental, Health and Safety (EHS) profession; the integration of the architecture profession’s standards for sustainable design (Leadership in Energy Efficient Design or LEED) in baccalaureate programs; and increasingly, the emphasis on the “Three E’s” (environment, ecology and ethics) in management and business programs. We are confident that the proposed Sustainable Product Design and Innovation (SPDI) degree program addresses pressing ethical, global issues by “frontloading” sustainability into the design and manufacture of consumer items. We feel that SPDI also meets the 13 missions of our departments and the College, in particular, by teaching creative problem solving skills and the profound values embedded in the concepts of sustainability and stewardship. SPDI will prepare students for a wide range of excellent career opportunities in design, manufacturing, digital imaging, environmental management systems and engineering support, as well as admission to graduate studies in Industrial Design and MBA programs and articulations to manufacturing engineering or engineering technology programs. SPDI also directly answers the Governor’s and USNH Chancellor’s well-publicized calls for stepped-up support for the State’s innovative, high-tech manufacturing industry. The proposed Bachelor of Science in Sustainable Product Design and Innovation strongly supports and advances the general mission of Keene State College. Product design, the study and design of the manmade world, is intrinsically interdisciplinary and requires an understanding of aesthetic, cultural, economic, scientific, technical, and practical issues. The SPDI major integrates this range of subjects through the knowledge, skills, and values of the program. The curriculum offers a foundation of knowledge in: design, materials science, sustainable criteria, digital technology, manufacturing processes, quantitative analysis and hands-on technical skills. All courses are focused on the education of the student rather than the training of the student, thus distinguishing SPDI from a vocational approach and enhancing the program’s alignment with the mission of the College as an institutional of higher learning. The SPDI program reinforces the KSC mission in teaching students both critical and creative thinking processes though project based learning. As a multi-disciplinary major, SPDI embeds cross-disciplinary problem-solving by bringing the perspectives of business management and human factors to the sciences and manufacturing methods. The future will bring more integration of interdisciplinary teams to solve complex problems. A liberal arts education gives the product designer the broader base of knowledge, tailored to their interests, needed to work effectively in a complex world grappling with solutions to environmental and social sustainability issues. Through both the required major courses, as well as recommended Integrative Studies and a thoughtful selection of elective courses (or a minor), the curriculum is designed to help students learn the skills to become critical thinkers and communicators, to work as creative, committed team players, to be risk-takers, from researching topics, accessing a wide range of resources to developing new, unique technical solutions. As students acquire a solid understanding of design and scientific concepts, they are increasingly challenged to progress to more complex problems through a combination of studio, hands-on and real world projects. These projects often require a collaborative approach that is facilitated by the laboratory or learning community environment. Thus, through the combination of teaching sustainable design in a learning community, the SPDI program fosters the College’s mission of creating strong relationships among faculty and students and of engaging students in community. Additionally, sustainable design is taught not only as a knowledge area, but it is woven as a core value throughout all the courses, promoting the College’s mission of fostering “environmental stewardship and the need for sustainable solutions.” 14 Employment: Over the past thirty years, most graduates of the TDS Department��s manufacturing related programs have gone directly to work for employers throughout New England, with the largest percentage staying in southern New Hampshire. The range of employment is extensive and reflects the streamlining of the manufacturing sector. The present Product Design and Development program was initiated in the mid 1990’s and has been preparing students for interesting and challenging industrial positions in manufacturing engineering, design engineering, model making, manufacturing support, safety consulting, municipal code inspection, operations management, information technology, technical sales and electronics/computer applications. Graduates have found substantial positions at Pratt and Whitney, Markem Imaje Corp., Whitney Brothers, Sonnax, Accura Technics, Smiths Medical, Timken, and Corning Specialty Materials, to name just a few. Employers describe the requirements for the job of Product Designer as a bachelor���s degree in Industrial Design or a related field with an understanding of the design process, an understanding of manufacturing materials and processes, basic design skills, practical mechanical skills, 2D and 3D CAD skills, and skills in the rapidly changing computer-aided- manufacturing (CAM) technologies. The present PD&D program looks much like Industrial Design programs at other institutions but differs in its increased emphasis on understanding the manufacturing environment. The SPDI program anticipates the needs of the re-invigorated “lean and green” design and manufacturing business sector. Back in the late 1990’s, the NH Job Outlook and Locator estimated a job growth rate of 16% in Commercial and Industrial Designers from the years 2000 – 2010 with the following fields showing potential for growth in the near future: mechanical engineering (6.2%), mechanical design drafting (5.4%), environmental engineering (38.8%), and computer applications (50 - 80%). While it is difficult to know where most of the PD&D graduates have gone after their first job, we do know much about those who have remained in the local area, and the many firms locally who have hired our graduates. Following is a list of employers near Keene or regionally who have hired our students. Allen Medical, Acton MA Blanchard Machine Development, Hillsboro Cambridge Manufacturing, Keene, NH Corning Special Materials Chroma Technology, Bellows Falls, VT Dielectrics Inc. Chicopee, MA Markem Imaje Corp. Keene, NH New Balance, Lawrence MA Rapid Sheet Metal Inc., Nashua, NH Sargent Lock, Connecticut Sonnax Industries, Inc. Bellows Falls VT Smith Medical, Keene NH Timberland, Manchester NH Timken Super Precision, Keene, NH Whitney Bros. Keene, NH We regularly receive phone calls from employers away from the local area who have hired our graduates and are seeking others. Cambridge Manufacturing is an example of a firm that hired one student and has continued to maintain contact with us, seeking more graduates. We also receive calls from alums that are now employers themselves and are 15 seeking to hire our most recent graduates. We continually have more manufacturing firms looking for graduating entry-level product designers than we are able to fill. The trends towards overseas manufacturing in some sectors is shifting back to the US based partially because of the increasing cost of transportation and the difficulties with on time deliveries. The design of products in many cases has stayed in the USA where the designers can maintain close connections to the markets and the consumers of the products they design. Recently companies involved in manufacturing are setting corporate policies to reflect the shift of manufacturing back to US. Hypertherm, a manufacturer of plasma cutting equipment in Lebanon, NH, has a corporate policy to choose the supplier that is closest to their NH location all other factors being relatively equal. This kind of thinking is helping to reinvigorate the US manufacturing sector. The companies with “high value added” to their products through design and engineering are thriving. Sectors like the medical products industry is thriving due to the high quality and traceability requirements of the Food and Drug Administration’s regulations. Need for Program Visibility Most students currently find the Product Design and Development program option within the Technology Studies major through word of mouth once they arrive on campus. The introductory courses like Visual Communications and Exploring Technology were places where students could hear about the PD&D program and receive advising about their college options. These courses are not currently offered and have been replaced primarily with the Integrative Studies course in Thinking and Writing – Designing Your Our Way. Students also hear about the program from dorm mates and then try a course in the major. Students and parents have expressed frustration with not being able to find the program when doing web searches to find programs that match the student’s interests. This new Sustainable Product Design and Innovation major at Keene State College will allow the program to come up on searches with key words like industrial design, design, product design, innovation and sustainability. The program can build a web presence to help prospective students find the program. This stand alone major will reflect the reality of what the program offers and frame the future direction of the discipline in keeping with the college mission. Program Design: The new program in Sustainable Product Design and Innovation is based on the strengths and success of the Product Design and Development Option with the Technology Studies major. The innovative thinking skills and technical knowledge are maintained while integrating the aspects of sustainability. Students are prepared for the challenges they will face in the developing lean, green manufacturing environment of the global economy. Innovative thinking skills are developed through ideation methodologies and open ended project based learning. Technical knowledge is gained through classroom lecture, student research, trips to the field and primarily through hands on experiences and problem solving. The SPDI program core courses concentrate the innovation and technical aspects and integrate sustainability issues in response to the rigor demanded by industry. Sustainable 16 product design issues look at the reduction of wastes, the reduction of toxicity, energy efficiency as well as the social and ethical issues around work and business models. The management core courses of the SPDI program include important decision making knowledge and skills also being demanded by industry. Many of the companies our graduates will be working in are smaller, requiring employees to be flexible and able to take on broader project responsibilities. The new lean, green sustainability challenges include decision making related to cost and the effects on workers, consumers and the environment in addition to the traditional aspects of product performance and manufacturability. The consequences of sustainability challenges are far reaching and need people able to work in interdisciplinary teams, teams that can reach across discipline boundaries and embrace the knowledge and skills of others. The number of credits required for the major reflects the product design innovation and technical core integrated with sustainability issues and the supplementary core of management courses needed to cover the business model and human aspects so important to a sustainability point of view. The allied required courses in Art, Safety Studies and Math support the breadth of knowledge valued in a liberal arts education. Two of the required courses are drawn from the Integrative Studies Program to create a program that students find accessible. The specific Integrative Studies courses fulfill the requirements in Quantitative Literacy, MGT 202 (currently approved as an Integrative Studies course and pending permanent status), and Arts and Humanities Perspectives, IA ART 103. These two courses count towards the Integrative Studies requirements and the requirements for the major but are only counted once towards the total credits for the degree. Students are encouraged to complete a minor in an organized cluster of courses related to their career interest. Suggested minors are: Safety Studies, Management, Allied Computer Science, Art, Environmental Studies, Economics, Geography, or International Studies. Math and Science (Physics and Chemistry) courses related to the Manufacturing Engineering field are encouraged. The 64 credits for the SPDI major, including 8 credits in Integrative Studies, reflects the intellectual rigor expected of our graduates to prepare them to implement product designs for a lean, green, global manufacturing environment directed towards a sustainable future. Students that find the program in their sophomore year can easily get through the program without adding time to their expected graduation date. The program planning sheets below show the program advising sheet, a sequence of courses in a four year plan and also a two year plan with the allied art and math courses taken in the sophomore year. A transition plan from the existing Technology Studies Option in Product Design and Development to the new SPDI program is included. 17 SUSTAINABLE PRODUCT DESIGN AND INNOVATION ‐ Bachelor of Science. (124 cr) Keene State College 2009‐2010 Catalog INTEGRATIVE STUDIES PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS (44 cr) Note: Students must complete the Thinking & Writing requirement within their first two semesters and the Quantitative Literacy requirement within their first three semesters. Foundations ITW: Thinking & Writing □ __________________________________________________________________ IQL: Quantitative Literacy1 □ __________________________________________________________________ Perspectives NOTE: Students may take only one course in any specific discipline within the PERSPECTIVES area. Disciplines are shown in BOLD, such as IAART. IA: Arts – IAART, IAMU, IATAD 1 course: □ __________________________________________ IH: Humanities ‐ IHCOMM, IHENG, IHFILM, IHFR, IHGER, IHHIST, IHJRN, IHML, IHPHIL, IHSP 2 courses: □ ______________________________________□ __________________________________________ IA/IH: 1 additional course in either IA1 or IH 1 course: □ ________________________________________ IN: Natural Sciences – INASTR, INBIO, INCHEM, INGEOL, INMET, INPHYS 2 courses: □ ________________________________________□ ________________________________________ IS: Social Sciences – ISANTH, ISCJS, ISECON, ISGEOG, ISPOSC, ISPSYC, ISSOC, ISSOSC 2 courses: □ ________________________________________□ ________________________________________ Interdisciplinary II: Any course beginning with II 1 course: □ ________________________________________ NOTE: Courses fulfilling PERSPECTIVES and INTERDISCIPLINARY requirements may be at the 100‐400 level. All students must complete a minimum of 28 credits at the 100‐200 level and a minimum of 8 credits at the 300‐400 level to complete the Integrative Studies Program (ISP). 1 Specific Integrative course requirements for the major are noted below. (2 courses, 8 credits) Courses may be used to satisfy an Integrative Studies requirement; credits only count once towards the total number of credits in the baccalaureate degree. ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 18 MAJOR REQUIREMENTS (64 cr) Sustainable Product Design and Innovation Core: (28 cr) □ SPDI 152 Product Design I □ SPDI 110 Electricity & Electronics Fund □ SPDI 252 Product Design II □ SPDI 180 Metal Processes & Prototyping2 □ SPDI 253 Materials ‐ A Life Cycle View □ SPDI 221 Three ‐ Dimensional CADD2 □ SPDI 352 Product Design III Management Core: (16 cr) □ MGT 101 Introduction to Management □ MGT 202 Quantitative Decision Making 1 □ MGT 213 Financial Accounting 1Course may be used to satisfy an IQL Integrative Studies Program requirement; credits only count once. Select at least one from the following □ MGT 331 Principles of Marketing □ MGT 446 Competitive Manufacturing Mgt. Sustainable Product Design and Innovation and Management Electives: (4 cr) Select at least one from the following or the equivalent of 4credits: □ SPDI 121 Drafting, Sketching and CADD2 □ SPDI 290 Special Topics (1‐4 cr.) □ SPDI 170 Intro. to Woodworking Tech2 □ SPDI 298 Independent Study (1‐4 cr.) □ SPDI 270 Woodworking Processes □ SPDI 490 Advanced Special Topics (1‐4 cr.) □ SPDI 280 CAD/CAM ‐ using MasterCAM □ SPDI 495 Seminar (1‐4 cr) □ MGT 451 Social, Legal, & Political Env. of Bus. □ SPDI 498 Independent Study(1‐4 cr) Allied Discipline Requirements: (12 cr.) □ IA ART103 Three Dimensional Design1 1Course may be used to satisfy an Integrative Studies Program requirement; credits only count once. □ SAFE 204 Human Factors in Safety MATH Select at least one from the following □ MATH 120 Applied Algebra & Trigonometry □ MATH 130 Pre‐calculus □ MATH 151 Calculus I Product Design and Development Capstone: (4 cr) □ SPDI 400 Manufacturing Enterprise Internships / Cooperative Education Experiences are recommended: □ SPDI 294 Cooperative Education (2‐4 cr./can ONLY be used toward open elective) □ SPDI 494 Advanced Cooperative Education (2‐4 cr./can ONLY be used toward open elective) NOTE: 2SPDI 121 Drafting, Sketching and CADD and SPDI 170 Introduction to Woodworking Technology are preparatory courses recommended for those with little or no prior Sketching and CADD or shop experience and are to be taken prior to SPDI 221 3D CADD and/or SPDI 180 Metal Processes and Prototyping respectively. Many students come to the program with High School or work experience in Drafting and CADD and/ or Shop practices. This arrangement allows flexibility for these students to take more SPDI electives. Note: Please see the catalog for COMPLETE program requirements. This sheet is for general advising purposes only. 19 Sustainable Product Design and Innovation Four Year Advising Plan FRESHMAN YEAR Fall Semester SPDI Elective: SPDI 121 Drafting, Sketching and CADD1 or SPDI 170 Intro. to Woodworking Tech.1 or major course or Open Elective MGT 101 Introduction to Management ITW 101 Requirement ISP Requirement Spring Semester SPDI Elective: SPDI 121 Drafting, Sketching and CADD1 or SPDI 170 Intro. to Woodworking Tech.1 or major course MATH 120 Applied Algebra & Trig. or higher2 ISP Requirement IAART 103 Three-Dimensional Design SOPHOMORE YEAR Fall Semester SPDI 152 Product Design I SPDI 180 Metal Processes & Prototyping1 MGT 202 Quantitative Decision Making (IQL) ISP Requirement Spring Semester SPDI 252 Product Design II SPDI 221 Three - Dimensional CADD1 SPDI 110 Electricity & Electronics Fund. ISP Requirement JUNIOR YEAR Fall Semester SPDI 352 Product Design III SAFE 204 Human Factors in Safety SPDI/Open Elective ISP Requirement Spring Semester SPDI 253 Materials - A Life Cycle View MGT 213 Financial Accounting SPDI/Open Elective ISP Requirement SENIOR YEAR Fall Semester SPDI 400 Manufacturing Enterprise SPDI / Open Elective SPDI /Open Elective ISP Requirement Spring Semester MGT 331 Marketing or MGT 446 Competitive Manufacturing Mgt SPDI/Open Elective SPDI/Open Elective ISP Requirement 1SPDI 121 Drafting, Sketching and CADD and SPDI 170 Introduction to Woodworking Technology are preparatory courses recommended for those with little or no prior Sketching and CADD or shop experience and are to be taken prior to SPDI 221 3D CADD and/or SPDI 180 Metal Processes and Prototyping. Many students come to the program with High School or work experience in Drafting and CADD and/ or Shop practices. This arrangement allows flexibility for these students to take more SPDI electives. 2Any higher level Math class in the analysis sequence can be substitutes for Math 120 Please see your advisor by the end of freshman year for individual curriculum planning. 20 Sustainable Product Design and Innovation – Bachelor of Science Sequential Outline of the Proposed Curriculum: Four Year Planning If the student starts the program in the sophomore year, second semester or Transfers in with the equivalent of MATH 120 or higher and IAART 103 FRESHMAN YEAR Fall Semester ITW Elective Open Elective ISP Requirement ISP Requirement Spring Semester Open Elective Open Elective ISP Requirement ISP Requirement SOPHOMORE YEAR Fall Semester Open Elective Open Elective ISP Requirement ISP Requirement Spring Semester MATH 120 Applied Algebra & Trig. or higher 2 IA ART 103 Three-Dimensional Design Open Elective ISP Requirement JUNIOR YEAR Fall Semester SPDI 121 Drafting, Sketching and CADD1 or major course or Open Elective SPDI 170 Intro. to Woodworking Tech1 or major course or SPDI Elective MGT 101 Introduction to Management SPDI 152 Product Design I Spring Semester SPDI 252 Product Design II SPDI 180 Metal Processes & Prototyping SPDI 221 Three - Dimensional CADD MGT 202 Quantitative Decision Making (IQL) SENIOR YEAR Fall Semester SPDI 110 Electricity & Electronics Fund. SPDI 352 Product Design III SPDI 400 Manufacturing Enterprise MGT 213 Financial Accounting Spring Semester SPDI 253 Materials - A Life Cycle View MGT 331 Marketing or MGT 446 Competitive Manufacturing Mgt SAFE 204 Human Factors in Safety ISP Requirement 1SPDI 121 Drafting, Sketching and CADD and SPDI 170 Introduction to Woodworking Technology are preparatory courses recommended for those with little or no prior Sketching and CADD or shop experience and are to be taken prior to SPDI 221 3D CADD and/or SPDI 180 Metal Processes and Prototyping. Many students come to the program with High School or work experience in Drafting and CADD and/ or Shop practices. This arrangement allows flexibility for these students to take more SPDI electives. 2Any higher level Math class in the analysis sequence can be substitutes for Math 120 Please see your advisor by the end of freshman year for individual curriculum planning. 21 Transition Plan The new program in Sustainable Product Design and Innovation (SPDI) builds on the previous Product Design and Development (PD&D) Option in Technology Studies. Any student matriculated before Fall 2007 will follow the previous Transition plan from 3 credits to 4 credits. Any student matriculated during the period from the Fall of 2007 to the Spring of 2009 who is following the old program and has not completed TDS 101, may take MGT 446 or any of the listed SPDI Elective courses. Course equivalents for the new program during the transition from PD&D to SPDI: TDS 328 will equal SPDI 221, TDS 153 will equal SPDI 180 and TDS 290 CAD/CAM using MasterCAM will equal SPDI 280. All other course numbers will transition directly from TDS to SPDI. The total number of credits required for the old program will remain at 40, while the new program requires 56 credits plus 8 specified credits in Integrative Studies. Product Design and Development Sustainable Product Design and Innovation MAJOR REQUIREMENTS: 40 Cr. MAJOR REQUIREMENTS: 56 +8 ISP Cr. Product Design & Development Foundation (16 credits) TDS 101 Manufacturing Process TDS 110 Electricity & Electronics Fund. TDS 152 Product Design I TDS 170 Intro to Woodworking Technology Product Design & Development Specialty (12 credits) TDS 153 Machine Tool Process TDS 252 Product Design II TDS 352 Product Design III Product Design & Development Electives (8 credits) Select a minimum of 8 credits from the following: TDS 121, 228, 253, 270, 290, 298, 328, 452, 490, or 498 Product Design & Development Capstone (4 credits) TDS 400 Manufacturing Enterprise SPDI Core (28 credits) SPDI 110 Electricity & Electronics Fund. SPDI 152 Product Design I SPDI 180 Metal Processes & Prototyping SPDI 252 Product Design II SPDI 253 Materials - A Life Cycle View SPDI 221 Three - Dimensional CADD SPDI 352 Product Design III Management Core (12 credits + 4 credits Integrative studies*) MGT 101 Introduction to Management MGT 202 Quantitative Decision Making (IQL)* MGT 213 Financial Accounting MGT 331 Principles of Marketing (Or) MGT 446 Competitive Manufacturing Mgt Required Allied Courses: (8 credits + 4 credits Integrative studies*) IA ART103 Three Dimensional Design* SAFE 204 Human Factors in Safety MATH 120 or (MATH 130, 151 or 152) SPDI Capstone(4 credits) SPDI 400 Manufacturing Enterprise SPDI/MGT Electives (4 credits) SPDI 121, 170, 270, 280, 290, 298, 490 or 498, MGT 451 22 RESOURCES: Indicate whether additional staffing, facilities, and/or equipment will be required. Also, consider the long-term impact of adding a course or altering a program. When a proposal has staffing, space or monetary implications, the VPAA must be consulted and his or her comments should be included in this section. List of Faculty expected to teach in the program: Full-time load Ms. Lisa Hix, TDS, Full-Time Adjunct Faculty [Contract Faculty], BFA Industrial Design, MBA Partial load Ms. Barbara Charkey, MGT, Professor, MBA & CPA Dr. Richard Foley, TDS, Professor, EdD Dr. Steven King, MGT, Professor, PhD Dr. John Pappalardo, MGT, Professor, PhD Dr. Charles Sheaff, TDS, Professor, EdD Mr. Robert Simoneau, MGT, Professor, MS Engineering Adjunct coverage Mr. Randall Blodgett, TDS, Adjunct, BS Industrial Technology Mr. Bernard Cooper, TDS, Adjunct, BS Industrial Technology Mr. Norm Fisk, TDS, Adjunct, PE Mr. Walter Nicolai, Art, Adjunct, MFA Mr. James ONeil, MGT, Adjunct Mr. Frank Parish, TSD, Adjunct, BS Technology Studies Note: See the attached letter in the Advisory Opinion section from the college administration reflecting a commitment to a tenure track faculty line specifically for the SPDI program. Program Coordinator Dr. Richard Foley, TDS, Professor, EdD Anticipated impact related to academic and career counseling services: none List resources needed and related costs for implementation of the program: Staffing: The conversion of the current PD&D option to a new SPDI degree program should not require increased expenditures for staffing. The current level of staffing within the departments most involved in the SPDI program (tenure-track, full-time faculty, full-time contracted faculty and part-time adjunct instructors in the TDS and Management) should be sufficient to meet the enrollment demand based on anticipated enrollment for the next five years. The only significant staffing requirement that needs to be addressed is that the College Administration extends its previous commitment over the 23 past 4-years to continue to fund a full-time adjunct position for PD&D. Additionally, it would be most appropriate, however, to convert this full-time contracted position assigned to PD&D/SPDI in TDS department to tenure-track in the near future. Calculating the Full-time Equivalents necessary to deliver the program is not a straightforward process due to the multi-disciplinary nature of the curriculum and the key contributions that TDS and Management faculty make to the College’s Integrative Studies program. In one narrowly defined approach, the projected SPDI program faculty will consist of [2.25] FTE tenure /tenure track and [1.25] FTE adjunct faculty. If additional contributions of TDS and Management faculty to the overlapping Integrative Studies and SPDI program requirements are considered, the numbers could be revised to 3.5 plus FTE full-time tenure track and approximately 2.00 FTE adjunct. These key participating faculty allied with the TDS and MGT departments (see the above list) will also be supported by faculty teaching Integrative Studies courses offered by the Art and Mathematics departments. Additionally, TDS and MGT departments will be positioned to continue their productive relationships with committed, talented PD&D and management adjunct faculty who serve as liaisons to regional industries without altering, to any great extent, current levels of adjunct faculty teaching loads. Current levels of TDS and MGT department administrative/secretarial support should not be affected. Supply budget: Since the Product Design and Development option has been a long established program sponsored by the TDS Department, current funding levels as administered through the TDS budget process would be adequate to support future office and laboratory supply needs. Furthermore, the transformation of the PDD option to a SPDI major will require no additional funding or resources on the part of the MGT department’s operating budget. Equipment: The TDS Department has been eager to invest in a Rapid Prototype Machine (RPM) and to redesign and outfit the exiting PD&D machine tool lab as a cutting-edge Manufacturing/Prototype environment. The RPM produces accurate 3- dimensional prototypes from plastic compounds based on computer-generated commands. RPM’s have in many cases replaced expensive, labor-intensive metal prototype craftsmanship, much as digital desktop color printers have replaced large, complex four-color offset presses in the printing industry. The RPM will immediately enhance the laboratory experience for students by allowing them to convert computer-aided designs into accurate models in a matter of hours. The RPM also promises to convert the common negative public perception of the PD&D laboratory (most visitors “see” an archaic machine shop in Adams Tech) to a “wow” as they witness a hi-tech device literally spinning out a highly detailed objects. 24 The TDS and MGT departments are working cooperatively to piece together the $30,000 funding to purchase a RPM unit. These efforts are outlined in more detail in the next section of the proposal. Facilities: Although the proposed SPDI program could be delivered using the current facilities, the SPDI faculty, with the support of the Advisory Council anticipate recommending upgrades to the central SPDI manufacturing laboratory. The timing for these recommendations could not come at a better time. The College has hired a consulting firm that is currently working with campus facilities planning groups to assess the TDS department’s main facilities — Adams Tech and Butterfield. Both buildings have been targeted for updating to meet both building/USNH codes and campus space needs. A modest portion of the anticipated renovation budgets could be assigned to making improvements in the SPDI classrooms and laboratories, which might include moving the electronics equipment on the second floor of Adams Tech (freeing space for a renovated classroom) and reconfiguring the proposed Manufacturing/Prototype lab to maximize the impact of the proposed rapid prototype machine (RPM). Lastly, it is anticipated that the current plans for renovations to the facilities housing the SPDI laboratories and classrooms in Adams Tech are based on the College’s and USNH’s capital improvement funds. Such renovations will not tap the TDS department’s budget. This initiative is designed to maximize existing College resources and to solicit additional support from industry in order to develop a SPDI program that the TDS Department can sponsor and maintain within current financial realities. Identify funding sources, both existing and anticipated (specify estimated revenues) Although existing and anticipated budgets allocated through the School of Professional Studies and the Technology, Design, and Safety Department budgets will cover the SPDI operations, the pending transformation to SPDI has already created a buzz in local manufacturing businesses. The anticipation of the new program is generating support both in terms of financial contributions and participation on the new SPDI Advisory Council and the Management Department’s newly expanded business committee. Currently, one of several potential outside funding sources has donated $5,000 as matching funds for the purchase of a rapid prototyping machine (RPM) for the SPDI program. The total cost of the RPM package has been estimated at $30,000 to cover the cost of the RPM hardware, supplies for three years and a maintenance agreement. Currently, the TDS department anticipates that a combination of $15,000 in AY 2008/9 from the TDS equipment budget, College or School of Professional Studies monies, and outside funding contributions will be acquired in time to purchase a RPM in the summer of 2008. It is the goal of the TDS Department that the RPM will be operable by the start of the Fall 2008 semester. 25 It should be noted that additional monies might be generated on a one-time basis through the sale of surplus manufacturing equipment — machine tools made redundant by the purchase of the Rapid Prototype Machine. Monies for Enhancements: The TDS Department’s success with soliciting donations, in-kind support and grant funding for the Safety program in the past ten years has netted approximately $250,000 in donations, along with a string of grants totaling more than $3 million in awards. MGT faculty member Robert Simoneau directed a $200,000 three-year NSF grant in the mid-1990’s to upgrade the current PD&D laboratory. The TDS and MGT faculty plan on working with the SPDI Steering Committee and Advisory Council, as well as the MGT business consultant group, to lead the institutional effort at acquiring outside funding for SPDI, including extramural grant applications. Given the preeminence of the region’s manufacturing sector and the College’s past contributions to industry, the TDS and MGT faculty are confident that they will build on the current modest $5,000 gift towards the RPM to access appropriate untapped resources. Additional library resources No additional Library Resources are anticipated at this time Additional Note: Please note: A new course proposal, MGT 446 Competitive Manufacturing Management is being sponsored by the Management Department and are currently being reviewed by the School of Science Curriculum Committee. (Note: this course has been approved by the School of Science Curriculum Committee 3/31/08) ADVISORY OPINIONS: List the names of affected departments and include department responses. Advisory opinions are required whenever a proposal affects the curricula of other programs. A proposal must list all affected departments. An Advisory Opinion must be solicited at least two weeks prior to delivery of the proposal to the School of Professional Studies Curriculum Committee. Affected departments have two weeks to respond to the request for an Advisory Opinion. Responses should be attached to the proposal. In the event that affected departments do not respond, evidence of the request for an Advisory Opinion from non-respondents must be provided. (The electronic curriculum review process tracks votes, advisory opinions and comments as required at each stage of the review.) See attached letter of support from the Management Department, the Art Department, the Math Department and the Keene State College Administration. 26 27 SIGNATURE PAGE 2007-2008 1. Sponsoring Program: Technology, Design, and Safety Department for Addition of a Bachelor in Science in Sustainable Product Design and Innovation developed from the Product Design and Development Option within the Technology Studies major Chair Signature: _______________________ For _7_ Against _0__ Abstain__0_ Absent _1__ Date _2-29-2008____________ 2. Advisory Opinions: List the names of the affected departments and include department responses. Department of Management Department of Art See letters of support attached to the four-year Sustainable Product Design and Innovation (SPDI) Program proposal. 3. School Curriculum Committee (or the ISPC ONLY for Course Proposals designated II): Comment: For ___ Against ___ Abstain ___ Absent ___ Chair: ________________________Date ________ 4. Dean: Comment: Approved____ Not Approved____ Signature: _________ Date ________ 5. Senate Curriculum Committee: Comment: For ___ Against___ Abstain ___ Absent ___ Chair: __________________________Date _________ 6. Keene State College Senate: Passed ___ Failed ___ Information___ Signature: ____________________________ Date ________ 7. Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs: Passed ___ Failed ___ Information___ Signature: _____________________________Date ________ 8. President: Passed ___ Failed ___ Information___ Signature: ____________________________ Date ________ 28 29 KEENE STATE COLLEGE 2007-2008 ACADEMIC PROGRAM PROPOSAL FORM DATE: March 1, 2008 SPONSORING PROGRAM AND CHAIR: Identify the department and chair. Include phone number and email address. Technology, Design and Safety Department Chair: Larry McDonald Phone: 358-2976 Email: lmcdonal@keene.edu Department of Management Chair: John Pappalardo Phone: 358-2662 Email: jpappala@keene.edu PROPOSAL SPONSOR: Identify the person(s) who should be contacted regarding the proposal. Include phone number and email address. This person is expected to attend Divisional and/or Senate Curriculum meetings to discuss the proposal. Richard Foley Phone: 358-2893 Email: rfoley@keene.edu John Pappalardo Phone: 358-2662 Email: jpappala@keene.edu Charles Sheaff Phone: 358- 2887 Email: csheaff@keene.edu TITLE SUMMARY: Minor in Sustainable Product Design and Innovation PROPOSED ACTION: Underline proposed changes. Program addition Change in requirements* Program redesign Program deletion Other: 30 EXISTING (OLD) DATA: The 2006 -2007 KSC Catalog had a Technology Studies Minor which was deleted for the 2007-2008 Catalog PROPOSED (NEW) PROGRAM: Specify degree, major, option, specialization or minor as appropriate. Provide the proposed program in its entirety and as it would appear in the KSC Catalog. If this change affects other programs, please note all the places (page numbers in the current catalog) where this change must be made. SUSTAINABLE PRODUCT DESIGN AND INNOVATION Minor (24 Credits) A minor in Sustainable Product Design and Innovation will provide a technical and design thinking background for students majoring in other disciplines. The following course outline will provide complimentary studies to Majors in Safety Studies, Architecture, Management, Applied Computer Science, Environmental Studies, Math/Physics and Art. SPDI CORE COURSES: (12 Credits) SPDI 110 Electricity & Electronics Fundamentals SPDI 152 Product Design I SPDI 253 Materials - A Life Cycle View SPDI ELECTIVES FOR THE MINOR: (12Credits) Select at least ONE of the following: (4 Credits) SPDI 170 Intro. to Woodworking Tech. SPDI 180 Metal Processes & Prototyping Select at least ONE of the following: (4 Credits) SPDI 121 Drafting, Sketching and CADD SPDI 221 Three-Dimensional CADD Select at least ONE of the following SPDI or Management courses at 300 or 400 Level: (4 Credits) SPDI 400 Manufacturing Enterprise MGT 446 Competitive Manufacturing Mgt. MGT 331 Principles of Marketing PROGRAM OBJECTIVES AND /OR LEARNING OUTCOMES: See the four-year Bachelor of Science major in Sustainable Product Design and Innovation (SPDI) Program proposal for learning outcomes related to the SPDI program. 31 RATIONALE: A minor in Sustainable Product Design and Innovation (SPDI) will provide a technical and design thinking background for students majoring in other disciplines. The course requirements will provide complimentary studies to Majors in Safety Studies, Architecture, Management, Applied Computer Science, Environmental Studies, Math/Physics and Art. Based on the Minor in Technology Studies, the new minor in Sustainable Product Design and Innovation will allow students in related majors to gain a relevant and timely technical knowledge and skills important in addressing societal and industry multidisciplinary challenges. RESOURCES: See the four-year Bachelor of Science major in Sustainable Product Design and Innovation (SPDI) Program proposal for resources related to the SPDI program. Additional library resources No additional Library Resources are anticipated at this time ADVISORY OPINIONS: See attached letters of support from the Management, Art and Math Departments in the four-year Bachelor of Science major in Sustainable Product Design and Innovation (SPDI) Program proposal. 32 2009-2010 Catalog KEENE STATE COLLEGE Note: For advising support only. Sustainable Product Design and Innovation Minor See catalog for full degree requirements. Name: _________________________________ID#:___________________ MINOR REQUIREMENTS: 24 credits SPDI CORE COURSES for the MINOR: (12 Credits) □ SPDI 110 Electricity & Electronics Fund. □ SPDI 152 Product Design I □ SPDI 253 Materials - A Life Cycle View SPDI ELECTIVES for the MINOR: (12Credits) Select at least ONE of the following: (4 Credits) □ SPDI 170 Intro. to Woodworking Tech. □ SPDI 180 Metal Processes & Prototyping Select at least ONE of the following: (4 Credits) □ SPDI 121 Drafting, Sketching and CADD □ SPDI 221 Three-Dimensional CADD Select at least ONE of the following SPDI or Management courses at 300 or 400 Level: (4 Credits) □ SPDI 400 Manufacturing Enterprise □ MGT 446 Competitive Manufacturing Mgt. □ MGT 331 Principles of Marketing 33 SIGNATURE PAGE 2007-2008 1. Sponsoring Program: Technology, Design, and Safety Department for Minor in Sustainable Product Design and Innovation developed from the Technology Studies minor (2006-2007 Catalog) Chair Signature: _______________________ For _7_ Against _0__ Abstain__0_ Absent _1__ Date _2-29-2008____________ 2. Advisory Opinions: List the names of the affected departments and include department responses. Department of Management Department of Art See letters of support attached to the four-year Sustainable Product Design and Innovation (SPDI) Program proposal. 3. School Curriculum Committee (or the ISPC ONLY for Course Proposals designated II): Comment: For ___ Against ___ Abstain ___ Absent ___ Chair: ________________________Date ________ 4. Dean: Comment: Approved____ Not Approved____ Signature: _________ Date ________ 5. Senate Curriculum Committee: Comment: For ___ Against___ Abstain ___ Absent ___ Chair: __________________________Date _________ 6. Keene State College Senate: Passed ___ Failed ___ Information___ Signature: ____________________________ Date ________ 7. Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs: Passed ___ Failed ___ Information___ Signature: _____________________________Date ________ 8. President: Passed ___ Failed ___ Information___ Signature: ____________________________ Date ________ 34 35 KEENE STATE COLLEGE 2007-2008 ACADEMIC PROGRAM PROPOSAL FORM DATE: March 1, 2008 SPONSORING PROGRAM AND CHAIR: Identify the department and chair. Include phone number and email address. Technology, Design and Safety Department Chair: Larry McDonald Phone: 358-2976 Email: lmcdonal@keene.edu Department of Management Chair: John Pappalardo Phone: 358-2662 Email: jpappala@keene.edu PROPOSAL SPONSOR: Identify the person(s) who should be contacted regarding the proposal. Include phone number and email address. This person is expected to attend Divisional and/or Senate Curriculum meetings to discuss the proposal. Richard Foley Phone: 358-2893 Email: rfoley@keene.edu John Pappalardo Phone: 358-2662 Email: jpappala@keene.edu Charles Sheaff Phone: 358- 2887 Email: csheaff@keene.edu TITLE SUMMARY: Associate in Science: Technology Studies program PROPOSED ACTION: Underline proposed changes. Program addition Change in requirements* Program redesign Program deletion Other: Change in description 36 EXISTING (OLD) DATA: Catalog and Advising Program Planning Sheet Technology Studies Associate in Science The two-year Technology Studies Program provides specialized preparation within a very flexible curriculum format for individuals who plan to become technicians in industry. A primary goal of the program is to prepare students for solving the kinds of human and technical problems found in the technological environment. A core requirement is followed by a concentration of courses in CAD-CAM, Product Design, or Safety Studies through individual program design done in consultation with an academic advisor. Although the two-year Technology Studies Program is intended to lead to industrial employment, the program is fully transferable into the four-year Technology Studies Program at Keene State College. INTEGRATIVE STUDIES REQUIREMENTS 32 credits minimum o ITW 101 – 4 credits o IQL 101 – 4 credits o One course in the fine and performing arts (IA) o One course in the humanities (IH) o One course in the social sciences (IS) o One course in the natural sciences (IN) o One interdisciplinary course (II) o One course in fine and performing arts (IA) or humanities (IH) or social sciences (IS) or sciences (IN) or an interdisciplinary course (II) CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS 28 credits A concentration of courses is required in one of the following areas: Product Design Safety Studies These concentrations must be developed in consultation with a TDS Academic Advisor. TECHNOLOGY STUDIES ELECTIVES 28 credits Select at least 28 credits from one of the Technology, Design and Safety concentrations; at least 16 credits must be at the 200 level or above. ELECTIVES Select additional courses to reach a total of 60 credits for the degree. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 60 credits Note: Please see the catalog for COMPLETE program requirements. This sheet is for general advising purposes only. 37 TECHNOLOGY STUDIES: Associate in Science (60 cr) Keene State College 2007‐2008 Catalog INTEGRATIVE STUDIES PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS (32 cr) Foundations ITW: Thinking & Writing □ _____________________________ IQL: Quantitative Literacy □ _____________________________ Perspectives NOTE: Students may take only one course in any specific discipline within the PERSPECTIVES area. Disciplines are shown in BOLD, such as IAART. IA: Arts – IAART, IAMU, IATAD 1 course: □ _____________________________ IH: Humanities ‐ IHCOMM, IHENG, IHFILM, IHFR, IHGER, IHHIST, IHJRN, IHML, IHPHIL, IHSP 1 course: □ _____________________________ IN: Natural Sciences – INASTR, INBIO, INCHEM, INGEOL, INMET, INPHYS 1 course: □ _____________________________ IS: Social Sciences – ISANTH, ISCJS, ISECON, ISGEOG, ISPOSC, ISPSYC, ISSOC, ISSOSC 1 course: □ _____________________________ IA/IH/IS/IN/II ‐ 1 additional course in either IA, IH, IS, IN, or II 1 course: □ ____________________________ Interdisciplinary II: Any course beginning with II 1 course: □ _____________________________ MAJOR REQUIREMENTS (28 cr) A concentration of courses is required in one of the following areas (28 cr): □ Product Design □ Safety Studies Check below if 200‐level or higher (16 credits) □ _____________________________________ □ ____________________________________ □ _____________________________________ □ ____________________________________ □ _____________________________________ □ ____________________________________ □ _____________________________________ □ ____________________________________ □ _____________________________________ □ ____________________________________ □ _____________________________________ □ ____________________________________ □ _____________________________________ □ ____________________________________ 38 PROPOSED (NEW) PROGRAM: Specify degree, major, option, specialization or minor as appropriate. Provide the proposed program in its entirety and as it would appear in the KSC Catalog. If this change affects other programs, please note all the places (page numbers in the current catalog) where this change must be made. The program description will be Technology Studies Associate of Science Concentrations will be in: Sustainable Product Design and Innovation or Safety Studies Technology Studies Associate in Science The two-year Technology Studies Program provides specialized preparation within a very flexible curriculum format for individuals who plan to become technicians in industry. A primary goal of the program is to prepare students for solving the kinds of human and technical problems found in the technological environment. Integrative Studies requirements are taken along with a concentration of courses in Sustainable Product Design and Innovation( including courses in CAD/CAM) or in Safety Studies through individual program design done in consultation with an academic advisor. Although the two-year Technology Studies Program is intended to lead to industrial employment, the program is fully transferable into the four-year Sustainable Product Design and Innovation program or the four-year Safety Studies program at Keene State College depending on the choice of concentration courses. INTEGRATIVE STUDIES REQUIREMENTS 32 credits minimum (Note the online KSC catalog states 28 credits here) o ITW 101 – 4 credits o IQL 101 – 4 credits o One course in the fine and performing arts (IA) o One course in the humanities (IH) o One course in the social sciences (IS) o One course in the natural sciences (IN) o One interdisciplinary course (II) o One course in fine and performing arts (IA) or humanities (IH) or social sciences (IS) or sciences (IN) or an interdisciplinary course 39 (II) TECHNOLOGY STUDIES CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS 28 credits Select at least 28 credits from either the Sustainable Product Design and Innovation or the Safety Studies concentrations of the Technology, Design and Safety department; at least 16 credits must be at the 200 level or above. A 28 credit concentration of courses is required in one of the following areas: Sustainable Product Design and Innovation Safety Studies These concentrations must be developed in consultation with a TDS Academic Advisor. ELECTIVES Select additional courses if needed to reach a total of 60 credits for the degree. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 60 credits PROGRAM OBJECTIVES AND /OR LEARNING OUTCOMES: See the four year Sustainable Product Design and Innovation (SPDI) Program proposal for information concerning the SPDI program 40 TECHNOLOGY STUDIES: Associate in Science (60 cr) Keene State College 2009‐2010 Catalog INTEGRATIVE STUDIES PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS (32 cr) Foundations ITW: Thinking & Writing □ _____________________________ IQL: Quantitative Literacy □ _____________________________ Perspectives NOTE: Students may take only one course in any specific discipline within the PERSPECTIVES area. Disciplines are shown in BOLD, such as IAART. IA: Arts – IAART, IAMU, IATAD 1 course: □ _____________________________ IH: Humanities ‐ IHCOMM, IHENG, IHFILM, IHFR, IHGER, IHHIST, IHJRN, IHML, IHPHIL, IHSP 1 course: □ _____________________________ IN: Natural Sciences – INASTR, INBIO, INCHEM, INGEOL, INMET, INPHYS 1 course: □ _____________________________ IS: Social Sciences – ISANTH, ISCJS, ISECON, ISGEOG, ISPOSC, ISPSYC, ISSOC, ISSOSC 1 course: □ _____________________________ IA/IH/IS/IN/II ‐ 1 additional course in either IA, IH, IS, IN, or II 1 course: □ ____________________________ Interdisciplinary II: Any course beginning with II 1 course: □ _____________________________ MAJOR REQUIREMENTS (28 cr) A concentration of courses is required in one of the following areas (28 cr): □ Sustainable Product Design and Innovation □ Safety Studies Check below if 200‐level or higher (16 credits) □ _____________________________________ □ ____________________________________ □ _____________________________________ □ ____________________________________ □ _____________________________________ □ ____________________________________ □ _____________________________________ □ ____________________________________ □ _____________________________________ □ ____________________________________ □ _____________________________________ □ ____________________________________ □ _____________________________________ □ ____________________________________ 41 RATIONALE: The Associate degree remains in place to provide pathways to higher education for those interested in furthering their education but may not be ready for a four-year program. Typically this degree provides an option and the flexibility for those already employed in industry and those interested in gaining skills and knowledge in a particular area. The changes to the descriptions are from Product Design to Sustainable Product Design and Innovation and to clarify that there are two distinct tracks, Safety Studies and Sustainable Product Design and Innovation. The credit requirements for the concentration have been clarified. RESOURCES: See the four-year Bachelor of Science major in Sustainable Product Design and Innovation (SPDI) Program proposal for resources related to the SPDI program. Additional library resources No additional Library Resources are anticipated at this time ADVISORY OPINIONS: See attached letters of support from the Management, Math and Art Departments in the four-year Sustainable Product Design and Innovation (SPDI) Program proposal. 42 43 SIGNATURE PAGE 2007-2008 1. Sponsoring Program: Technology, Design, and Safety Department for Associate in Science :Technology Studies program change in description to reflect the change in name from a concentration in Product Design to a concentration in Sustainable Product Design and Innovation Chair Signature: _______________________ For _7_ Against _0__ Abstain__0_ Absent _1__ Date _2-29-2008____________ 2. Advisory Opinions: List the names of the affected departments and include department responses. Department of Management Department of Art See letters of support attached to the four-year Sustainable Product Design and Innovation (SPDI) Program proposal. 3. School Curriculum Committee (or the ISPC ONLY for Course Proposals designated II): Comment: For ___ Against ___ Abstain ___ Absent ___ Chair: ________________________Date ________ 4. Dean: Comment: Approved____ Not Approved____ Signature: _________ Date ________ 5. Senate Curriculum Committee: Comment: For ___ Against___ Abstain ___ Absent ___ Chair: __________________________Date _________ 6. Keene State College Senate: Passed ___ Failed ___ Information___ Signature: ____________________________ Date ________ 7. Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs: Passed ___ Failed ___ Information___ Signature: _____________________________Date ________ 8. President: Passed ___ Failed ___ Information___ Signature: ____________________________ Date ________ 44 Course Change Summary BS in Sustainable Product Design and Innovation Program Proposal Course Course Addition Number Change Title Change Credit Change Description Change Pre-requisite Change Course Deletion Prefix Change TDS 170 X TDS 294 X TDS 298 X TDS 400 X TDS 110 X X TDS 152 X X X TDS 252 X X X TDS 270 X X TDS 352 X X TDS 290 X X TDS 490 X X TDS 494 X X TDS 495 X X TDS 498 X X TDS 101 X TDS 121 X TDS 153 X TDS 228 X TDS 253 X TDS 328 X TDS 452 X TDS 160 X SPDI 121 X SPDI 180 X SPDI 221 X SPDI 253 X SPDI 280 X MGT 446 X 45 KEENE STATE COLLEGE 2007-2008 COURSE PROPOSAL FORM DATE: 2-29-2008 SPONSORING PROGRAM AND CHAIR: Technology, Design and Safety Department Chair: Larry McDonald Phone: 358-2976 Email: lmcdonal@keene.edu PROPOSAL SPONSOR: Richard Foley Phone: 358-2893 Email: rfoley@keene.edu Charles Sheaff Phone: 358- 2887 Email: csheaff@keene.edu TITLE SUMMARY: TDS 170 INTRODUCTION TO WOODWORKING TECHNOLOGY PROPOSED ACTION: Underline proposed changes. Course Addition Number Change Title Change Credit Change Description Change Prerequisite Change Course Deletion Course Replacement Other:Prefix Change EXISTING (OLD) DATA: TDS 170 INTRODUCTION TO WOODWORKING TECHNOLOGY Focus on woodworking systems in mass production applications and one-of-a-kind manufacturing. Emphasis on problem solving and creativity in laboratory activities. Function, maintenance, safety, and use of tools, machinery, and materials including supportive theory. 2 hr. lecture, 3 hr. lab. PROPOSED (NEW) COURSE TITLE: SPDI 170 INTRODUCTION TO WOODWORKING TECHNOLOGY (SPDI 170 INTRO. TO WOODWORKING TECH. for the 30 character abbreviation) 46 PROPOSED (NEW) COURSE: Focus on woodworking systems in mass production applications and one-of-a-kind manufacturing. Emphasis on problem solving and creativity in laboratory activities. Function, maintenance, safety, and use of tools, machinery, and materials including supportive theory. 2 hr. lecture, 3 hr. lab. LEARNING OUTCOMES: No change RATIONALE: The new course prefix reflects the new SPDI program proposal. RESOURCES: Faculty: Charles Sheaff, Tenured Professor No changes in facilities are required Additional library resources: None required at this time. ADVISORY OPINIONS: None Required 47 Keene State College Technology, Design and Safety SPDI 170 Introduction to Woodworking Technology Course Information Spring, Fall COURSE Focus on woodworking systems in mass production DESCRIPTION: applications and one-of-a-kind manufacturing. Emphasis on problem solving and creativity in laboratory activities. Function, maintenance, safety, and use of tools, machinery, and materials including supportive theory. 2 hr. lecture, 3 hr. lab. FACULTY: Dr. Charles A. Sheaff, Professor Office: BTR 204 Tel. 358-2887 Email: csheaff@keene.edu OFFICE HOURS: Monday and Tuesday 11:00 AM-12:00 noon Wednesday 8:00-9:00 AM CLASS Lecture: Tuesday, 9:00-10:50 AM BTR 101 SESSIONS: Lab: Thursday, 9:00-11:45 AM BTR 114 COURSE Upon completion of this course the student will: GOALS: -develop an awareness of the woodworking/manufacturing industry. -become familiar with wood as a building material; its properties and related products. -be able to identify and safely use hand and power tools used in the woodworking laboratory. -develop basic competencies used in constructing wood products. -develop a plan and bill of materials for a wood product. TEXTBOOK: Umstattd, William D. and Davis, Charles W. , Modern Cabinetmaking, Goodheart-Willcox Company Inc. 2004 48 SPDI 170 *ARTICLE (4 Required) Read an article in a current (not more than 6 REVIEWS months old) woodworking magazine or journal. Write a two part review of the article. The first part should briefly summarize the article. In the second part of the review, describe your feelings toward the subject; you could also include the impact the topic will have on the woodworking industry. "Woodshop News" found in the library, is an excellent source of articles for review. Be sure to include the source of the article, date, and page numbers. Article reviews are due on: February 5,19. March 4,18 LAB WORK: There will be both individual and mass produced projects completed during the lab portion of the course. The individual project will be selected by the student, who must complete a plan and bill of materials before starting work. The production project will involve the whole class. ATTENDANCE: For lectures and labs: Expected and desirable. Important course information is presented during these periods, many times relating to safety and the operation of machines. For exams: Absolutely mandatory. Proof of necessity of absence (physician's note) required before allowing to make up examination. Attendance will be taken at the conclusion of all lab sessions. ACADEMIC HONESTY STATEMENT: An academic institution is built upon certain fundamental principles, one of which is the principle of independent work, except when collaborative effort is accepted or required. Keene State College affirms the principle of academic integrity that any work presented as a student's own must, indeed, be that student's work, created by that student without unacknowledged aid or sources. Any violation of this principle strikes at the very heart of the academic enterprise and will be dealt with as a serious breach of conduct. DISABILITY STATEMENT: Students with disabilities who may need classroom accommodations are encouraged to make an appointment with Jane Warner or Jessica Bigaj in the Office of Disability Services (x2353). Please meet with me during office hours so that we can collaborate with the Office of Disability Services to provide the appropriate accommodations and supports to assist you in meeting the goals of the course. 49 SPDI 170 FINAL Computed as follows: GRADES: Examinations 4 @ 100 400 Project Work 300 Article Reviews 4@25 ea. 100 Final Exam 100 Attendance and Class Participation 100 1000 points Letter grades assigned: 1000 - 930 A 929 - 880 A/B 879 - 830 B 829 - 780 B/C 779 - 730 C 729 - 680 C/D 679 - 600 D Below 599 F 50 KEENE STATE COLLEGE TECHNOLOGY, DESIGN & SAFETY SPDI 170 INTRODUCTION TO WOODWORKING TECHNOLOGY TOPICAL OUTLINE INSTRUCTOR: DR. CHARLES SHEAFF SESSION TOPIC LEC 1 COURSE INTRODUCTION/SHOP SAFETY/PROJECT PLANNING LAB 1 WOOD AND WOOD MATERIALS LEC 2 HAND TOOL IDENTIFICATION LAB 2 POWER TOOL USE AND SAFETY LEC 3 POWER TOOL USE AND SAFETY LEC 4 GETTING OUT STOCK LEC 5 ADHESIVES AND CLAMPS LEC 6 WOODWORKING JOINTS LEC 7 FASTENERS LEC 8 DOORS, DRAWERS, AND SHELVES LEC 9 ABRASIVES AND SANDING LEC 10 FINISHING TECHNIQUES LEC 11 INTRODUCTION TO MASS PRODUCTION LEC 12 MASS PRODUCTION METHODS LEC 13 REVIEW FOR FINAL EXAM 51 KEENE STATE COLLEGE 2007-2008 COURSE PROPOSAL FORM DATE: 2-29-2008 SPONSORING PROGRAM AND CHAIR: Technology, Design and Safety Department Chair: Larry McDonald Phone: 358-2976 Email: lmcdonal@keene.edu PROPOSAL SPONSOR: Richard Foley Phone: 358-2893 Email: rfoley@keene.edu Charles Sheaff Phone: 358- 2887 Email: csheaff@keene.edu TITLE SUMMARY: TDS 294 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION and TDS 298 INDEPENDENT STUDY, PROPOSED ACTION: Underline proposed changes. Course Addition Number Change Title Change Credit Change Description Change Prerequisite Change Course Deletion Course Replacement Other:Prefix Change EXISTING (OLD) DATA: TDS 294 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 1-4 credits Introductory work-learning experience related to career interests, for which compensation may be received. Positions arranged and by students with sponsorship, approval and evaluation by full-time faculty. Elective credit only (normally 120 hours/credit) to maximum of 12 credits per degree program. Prerequisites: 24 total credits earned, 2.0 cumulative GPA, and permission of instructor. Graded Pass/Fail. Fall, Spring. TDS 298 INDEPENDENT STUDY 1-4 credits An opportunity for a qualified student to explore work in an area of individual interest, selected and pursued in consultation with a faculty member. Consent is required from the instructor who will supervise the independent study. May be repeated for a total of 4 credits. 52 PROPOSED (NEW) COURSE TITLE: SPDI 294 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION SPDI 298 INDEPENDENT STUDY PROPOSED (NEW) COURSE: SPDI 294 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 1-4 credits Introductory work-learning experience related to career interests, for which compensation may be received. Positions arranged and by students with sponsorship, approval and evaluation by full-time faculty. Elective credit only (normally 120 hours/credit) to maximum of 12 credits per degree program. Prerequisites: 24 total credits earned, 2.0 cumulative GPA, and permission of instructor. Graded Pass/Fail. Fall, Spring. SPDI 298 INDEPENDENT STUDY 1-4 credits An opportunity for a qualified student to explore work in an area of individual interest, selected and pursued in consultation with a faculty member. Consent is required from the instructor who will supervise the independent study. May be repeated for a total of 4 credits. LEARNING OUTCOMES: No change RATIONALE: The new course prefix reflects the new SPDI program proposal. RESOURCES: Faculty: TBD as needed No changes in facilities are required Additional library resources: None required at this time. ADVISORY OPINIONS: None Required 53 KEENE STATE COLLEGE 2007-2008 COURSE PROPOSAL FORM DATE: 2-29-2008 SPONSORING PROGRAM AND CHAIR: Technology, Design and Safety Department Chair: Larry McDonald Phone: 358-2976 Email: lmcdonal@keene.edu PROPOSAL SPONSOR: Richard Foley Phone: 358-2893 Email: rfoley@keene.edu Charles Sheaff Phone: 358- 2887 Email: csheaff@keene.edu TITLE SUMMARY: TDS 400 MANUFACTURING ENTERPRISE PROPOSED ACTION: Underline proposed changes. Course Addition Number Change Title Change Credit Change Description Change Prerequisite Change Course Deletion Course Replacement Other: Prefix change EXISTING (OLD) DATA: Organization and implementation of a student-managed industrial enterprise, including a general overview of economic systems and corporate structure. Emphasizes laboratory covering design, production and distribution of marketable consumer products. Two-hour lecture, three-hour lab. Prerequisite: Junior standing or above. Fall. PROPOSED (NEW) COURSE TITLE: SPDI 400 MANUFACTURING ENTERPRISE 54 PROPOSED (NEW) COURSE: No Change COURSE OBJECTIVES: No Change LEARNING OUTCOMES: No Change RATIONALE: The new course prefix supports the new SPDI program proposal. RESOURCES: Faculty: Charles Sheaff, Tenured Professor No changes in facilities are required Additional library resources: None required ADVISORY OPINIONS: None Required 55 KEENE STATE COLLEGE Technology, Design and Safety SPDI 400-01 Manufacturing Enterprise Course Information Fall Course description: Organization and implementation of a student-managed industrial enterprise, including a general overview of economic systems and corporation structure. Emphasizes laboratory covering design, production and distribution of marketable consumer products. Prerequisite: junior standing or above. Faculty: Dr. Charles A. Sheaff, Professor Office: BUTR 218, Tel. 358-2887 Email: csheaff@keene.edu Office Hours: Mon. and Wed. 9:00-10:00 AM 1:00-2:00 PM Class Sessions: Lecture: Monday 2:00-3:50 p.m. BUTR 114 Lab: Wednesday 2:00-3:50 p.m. BUTR 115 Course Requirements: 1. Students will complete all assignments indicated on the course materials. Other assignments may be made as the course progresses. 2. Students will complete all quizzes and exams with satisfactory scores. 3. Each student will complete a product idea report. 4. Each student will complete a product development activity. 5. Each student will participate in a product development report to the class. 6. Each student will write a detailed term paper on his assigned management responsibility, present it to the class, and evaluate the results. 7. Students will participate actively in all class activities. Attendance will effect grades. Attendance: Due to the nature of the course, attendance at all class sessions is necessary. The operation of the student-managed enterprise requires participation by all individuals in the class. As indicated below, a portion of the final grade will be based on attendance and participation in class activities. Grading: Product Development Reports 20% Management Activity Report 20% Production Activity Report 20% Marketing – Sales 20% Attendance and Class Participation 20% Academic Honesty Statement: An academic institution is built upon certain fundamental principles, one of which is the principle of independent work, except when collaborative effort is accepted or required. Keene State college affirms the principle of academic integrity that any work presented as a student's own must, indeed, be that student's work, created by that student without unacknowledged aid or sources. Any violation of this principle strikes at the very heart of the academic enterprise and will be dealt with as a serious breach of conduct. 56 SPDI 400-01 Manufacturing Enterprise Course Outline Date Topic Outside Assignments Aug 28 Course Introduction Aug 30 Products and Product Development Sept6 Company Organization Research Project " Idea Presentations Ideas Sept 11 Idea Presentations Product Decisions Research for Management Report Sept 18 Prototype Construction Constructions Plans Sept 25 Prototype Construction Report Research Management Sept 27 Management Reports 6 (20 mins ea.) (Production Management) Prepare Management Reports Oct 2 Production planning, Financial Planning Oct 4 Production Planning Marketing Strategies Jigs & Fixtures Plans due Oct 9 Jig & Fixture Construction Prepare Advertising Media Oct 11 Finish Jigs & Fixtures " Oct 16 Prepare Pilot Run " Oct 18 Pilot Run " Oct 23 Pilot Run Oct 25 Evaluate Pilot Run Marketing & Sales Training Oct 30 Production Run Sales Activity Nov1 " " Nov 6 " " Nov 8 " " Nov 13 “ Nov 15 Production Run Sales Activity Nov 20 Production Ends " Nov 29 Evaluate Production Distribution Planning " Dec 4 Sales & Distribution Distribution Activity Dec 6 “ “ 57 KEENE STATE COLLEGE 2007-2008 COURSE PROPOSAL FORM DATE: 2-29-2008 SPONSORING PROGRAM AND CHAIR: Technology, Design and Safety Department Chair: Larry McDonald Phone: 358-2976 Email: lmcdonal@keene.edu PROPOSAL SPONSOR: Richard Foley Phone: 358-2893 Email: rfoley@keene.edu Charles Sheaff Phone: 358- 2887 Email: csheaff@keene.edu TITLE SUMMARY: TDS 110 ELECTRICITY & ELECTRONICS FUNDAMENTALS PROPOSED ACTION: Underline proposed changes. Course Addition Number Change Title Change Credit Change Description Change Prerequisite Change Course Deletion Course Replacement Other:Prefix Change EXISTING (OLD) DATA: Insert the course information, as it exists in the current KSC Catalog. You may copy the information electronically from the KSC Web page: http://www.keene.edu/catalog/mdc.cfm An introductory course which examines topics from magnetism and electricity to electronics and microcomputers. A hands-on, experiential learning environment is used to stimulate creativity and understanding of the importance of electronics in today’s society. Recommended for all majors. Two-hour lecture, three-hour lab. Fall 58 PROPOSED (NEW) COURSE TITLE: SPDI 110 ELECTRICITY & ELECTRONICS FUNDAMENTALS PROPOSED (NEW) COURSE: An introductory course which examines topics from magnetism and electricity to electronics and microcomputers. A hands-on, experiential learning environment is used to stimulate creativity and understanding of the importance of electronics in today’s society. Two-hour lecture, three-hour lab. Fall, Spring LEARNING OUTCOMES: No change RATIONALE: The new course prefix and description reflect the new SPDI program proposal and the semester offerings of the course. RESOURCES: Faculty: Randy Blodget, Adjunct No changes in facilities are required Additional library resources: None required at this time. ADVISORY OPINIONS: None Required 59 KEENE STATE COLLEGE Technology, Design and Safety Course Syllabus SPDI 110 Electricity and Electronics Fundamentals (Fall, Spring) Class Meets: Tuesday and Thursday 2:00 – 3:50 Text: “Electricity and Electronics” Howard Gerrish Goodheart Willcox Publishing, Copyright 2004 edition “Electricity & Electronics Study Guide with Lab Activities” Roberts/Gerrish Course Description: An introductory course which examines topics from magnetism and electricity to electronics and microcomputers. A hands-on, experiential learning environment is used to stimulate creativity and understanding of the importance of electronics in today’s society. Two-hour lecture, three-hour lab. Course Objectives: This course will provide you with the basic understanding of electricity and electronics as it relates to your work and everyday living. Electronics has become an integral part of our daily lives, and it is important to be able to understand the technology that surrounds us and use this knowledge when working with electronics devices such as commuters, audio and video electronics, cellular phone/ fax systems or other electronic equipment in current use or that which is still to be developed. This course is the beginning of a series of courses which can prepare you for a rewarding career in various fields of the electronics computers, and electo-mechanical systems. With the knowledge gained from this course you will also become a better informed consumer of electronic appliances and equipment. Topics will range from magnetism to microcomputers with an emphasis on the underlying basic principles and laws of electricity and electronics and safety rules. Methodology: Through the methodology of this course it is expected that each student will be responsible for his or her own learning and that the instructor be viewed as a resource person to help you achieve the goals you set for yourself. By the methods used each student will develop techniques that will make him/her a self-sufficient learner. Lecture-discussions with demonstrations will be the primary teaching method. Laboratory experiments are designed to provide a hands-on approach to learning which reinforces the theories and topics discussed in the lectures. Selected homework will be regularly assigned to reinforce the learning process. Course Requirements: READ and STUDY the text and handout materials, answer the homework and the assigned student activity sheets, participate in classroom discussions and hands-on experiences and complete assigned lab activity reports. Evaluation: Four exams (including a comprehensive final) will constitute 60% of your grade. Laboratory experiments and reports and participation in classroom discussions will be 40%. Professor: Randy Blodgett 352-5440 E-mail rblodgett@ci.keene.nh.us Office hours by appt. 60 61 62 63 KEENE STATE COLLEGE 2007-2008 COURSE PROPOSAL FORM DATE: 2-29-2008 SPONSORING PROGRAM AND CHAIR: Technology, Design and Safety Department Chair: Larry McDonald Phone: 358-2976 Email: lmcdonal@keene.edu PROPOSAL SPONSOR: Richard Foley Phone: 358-2893 Email: rfoley@keene.edu Charles Sheaff Phone: 358- 2887 Email: csheaff@keene.edu TITLE SUMMARY: TDS 152 PRODUCT DESIGN I PROPOSED ACTION: Underline proposed changes. Course Addition Number Change Title Change Credit Change Description Change Prerequisite Change Course Deletion Course Replacement Other: Prefix Change EXISTING (OLD) DATA: This course is the first of a four-course sequence. It will emulate the product design and development process from start to finish. Topics include initial product ideas, quality control, prototype fabrication and testing. Two-hour lecture, three-hour lab. Fall. PROPOSED (NEW) COURSE TITLE: SPDI 152 PRODUCT DESIGN I 64 PROPOSED (NEW) COURSE: Product Design involves the integration of human and aesthetic aspects with technological and production aspects in the creation of manufactured products. This first in a series of courses in Product Design includes areas of human/object interface, product form, product innovation and an introduction to eco-design. Fall Prerequisite: IA ART 103 or permission of instructor. LEARNING OUTCOMES: Learning Outcomes: After completing this course, students will be able to demonstrate: - Comfortable use of sketching and model making as design tools - Human Centered Design research and ideation methodologies - Synthesize creative design solutions for product design challenges - Apply basic eco-design principles. - The use of concepts and methods involved in designing a product from various points of view in relation to the end user. - Creating product form and material connections using various new and reclaimed materials in open-ended design projects. - Applying the design process through projects and presentations. - Design research and ideation methodologies to develop product design requirements and concepts including eco-design checklists RATIONALE: The new course prefix and description revises the current course content and supports the new SPDI program proposal. RESOURCES: Faculty: Lisa Hix, Full Time Adjunct No changes in facilities are required Additional library resources: None required at this time. ADVISORY OPINIONS: None Required 65 KEENE STATE COLLEGE Technology, Design and Safety SPDI 152 Product Design I (Fall) Course Information Course Description: Product Design involves the integration of human and aesthetic aspects with technological and production aspects in the creation of manufactured products. This first in a series of courses in Product Design includes areas of human/object interface, product form, product innovation and an introduction to eco-design. Fall. Prerequisite or concurrent registration: IA ART 103 Three Dimensional Design. or permission of instructor. The course will include sketching and hands-on projects to emphasize aspects of design methods. Sketching and Projects will be completed in and out of class. Product design cases will be reviewed. Faculty: Lisa Hix Office: Adams 10B Office Hours: TBD Telephone: 358-2056 Email: lhix@keene.edu Class Sessions: Mon. & Weds. TBD Lecture and Lab Adams Tech. Rm. 12 & 13 Textbooks: Design Secrets: Products 2, 50 Real-life Projects Uncovered; IDSA and Haller, Lyn & Cullen, Cheryl Dangel; Rockport Publishers Inc. 2004 (NEW) Course Objectives: Students will have an opportunity to gain knowledge and skills through the following: - The use of concepts and methods involved in designing a product from various points of view in relation to the end user. - Hands-on experience with creating product form and material connections using various new and reclaimed materials in open-ended design projects. - Experiencing the design process through projects and presentations. - Design research and ideation methodologies to develop product design requirements and concepts including eco-design checklists Learning Outcomes: After completing this course, students will be able to demonstrate: - Comfortable use of sketching and model making as design tools - Human Centered Design research and ideation methodologies - Synthesize creative design solutions for product design challenges - Apply basic eco-design principles. Reading The Course Outline lists product cases by starting page in the text. Assignments: Read the assigned product cases. Choose at least one question to answer about one of the cases and enter it on the class Discussion Board on Blackboard, in preparation for class discussions, prior to the class indicated to receive any credit. One answer per question, per case until all questions have responses. Only then can late second responses be added. Lab Assignments: Hands on projects will be introduced periodically and worked on during lab time. Some time outside of class may be needed for project completion. There will be periodic project reviews and the project assignment must be completed by that time. Sketching will be done to accompany projects. NO LATE WORK WILL BE ACCEPTED without a note from a physician. 66 SPDI 152 Course Materials: You will need to purchase (available at the bookstore): Sketchbook – Moleskine (brand name) 7 ½” x 9 ¾”, blank 120 pages Prismacolor pencil – dark umber Mechanical Pencil – lead size .007 mm and HB hardness 4x4 squares/inch graph paper approx. 8 ½”x11” 6 inch long metal rule – demarcations to 1/64th inch 6 inch long flat scale – architects scale increments Utility Knife – for cutting corrugated cardboard Lab Procedures: You will be working on projects involving hand tools. Project materials will be provided. Access to the power tools is not available and will not be necessary. The small Band saw may be used with plastic and wood model making materials after competency with the machine is proven. At the end of each Lab period, all students will participate in cleaning up the area and putting tools and projects away. Dust masks and safety glasses must be worn during any sanding or filing activities. You can purchase your own safety glasses from the bookstore. Attendance: Attendance is expected and will be monitored. Important information not in the text is presented and discussed during class sessions making attendance very important. You are responsible for any material and assignments covered in class. Additional time outside of class will be needed to complete assignments. No make-ups on Presentations will be given without proof of the necessity of the absence with a physician’s note. . Unexcused absences will affect your final grade. Come to class and enjoy your learning experience. Academic Honesty: “The pleasures and sense of accomplishment in doing original scholarship are central to the college experience.” ���An academic institution is built upon certain fundamental principles, one of which is the principle of independent work, except when collaborative effort is accepted or required. Keene State College affirms the principle of academic integrity that any work, presented as a student’s own must indeed, be that student’s work, created by that student without unacknowledged aid or sources. Any violation of this principle strikes at the very heart of the academic enterprise and will be dealt with as a serious breach of conduct.” Please reference the full college policy on academic honesty in the KSC catalog or on this web page: http://www.keene.edu/catalog/acadpolicies.cfm#22 Disability Students with disabilities who may need classroom accommodations are Accommodations: encouraged to make an appointment with Jane Warner jwarner@keene.edu in the Office of Disability Services (8-2353). It is entirely your responsibility to contact the ODS and concurrently supply me with your Faculty Notification Accommodation letter, which will inform me exactly what accommodations to which you are entitled. This way I can support and assist you in meeting the goals of the course. See the websites for more info. http://www.keene.edu/disabilitysvs/ http://www.keene.edu/aspire/ http://www.keene.edu/counseling/ 67 SPDI 152 Evaluation: The final grade for this course will be computed as follows: Projects…………….…...70% Exams (2)…………….…20% Class Participation/ Attendance…….…….….10% (Including Discussion Board contributions) Letter grades will be assigned according to the following percentages: 100%-93% A (4.0) 92%-88% AB (3.5) 87%-83% B (3.0) 82%-78% BC (2.5) 77%-73% C (2.0) 72%-68% CD (1.5) 67%-60% D (1.0) Below 60% F (0.0) 68 SPDI 152 Course Outline and Reading Assignments Week (Dates 2007) Topic Reading Assignment (Product cases starting on page#) 1 (Aug. 27 & 29) Course Introduction Handouts and Human Factors and pg. 34 Lacrosse stick Hand Object Project pg. 90 Logi-camera pg. 132 Rabbit Corkscrew pg. 164 Baby care products pg. 186 Head immobilizer Labor Day Monday Sept. 3 – No class 2 (Sept. 5) Issues of Form pg. 78 Microphone Sketching pg. 86 Optical transceiver pg. 130 Soft edge ruler pg. 156 Birkenstock learning shoe pg. 160 Nike watch 3 (Sept. 10 & 12) Form/Function pg. 24 Wahoo sailboat pg. 118 Paint container pg. 122 Paint Pail pg. 180 Joey Clamp pg. 190 IV dressing 4 (Sept. 17 & 19) Form/Function pg. 30 Burton Snowboard boot pg. 94 Headset pg. 98 Safety Eyewear pg. 110 Water - Gate pg. 114 Watercone 5 (Sept. 24, 26 & Oct 1) Lab time for hand object Project Admired Object Assignment –What makes an object Desirable? 6 (Oct. 3) Hand object project Presentations Admired Object Assignment Due Design Project using Reclaimed Materials Introduction to Eco-Design checklists 7 (Oct. 8 & 10) Visual Intent Sketching Oct. 8 pg. 28 Windsurfing sails and Reclaimed Materials Project pg. 102 Torque Wrench pg. 126 Master Lock pg. 168 Toddler tableware pg. 194 Sensewear Connections and Lab time Oct. 10 pg. 20 Street Carver pg. 60 Spider Desk pg. 74 IBM Computer Screen pg. 140 Whirlpool Washer Dryer pg. 152 Maytag Washer Dryer 69 SPDI 152 Course Outline and Reading Assignments (cont’d) 8 (Oct. 15 & 17) Work on Reclaimed Mat. project pg. 46 Intelli-table Fisher -Price Project Presentations pg. 70 IBM Trans Notes User interface pg. 82 Treo communication device pg. 144 Wolf Oven pg. 202 Defibrillator 9 (Oct. 22 & 24) Midterm Exam Due pg. 50 KI Classroom furniture Human Factors & Seating pg. 54 Cachet Chair Steelcase Measure of Man Handout pg. 148 Sok bath Sketching pg. 172 Car seat IDEO pg. 198 Walkingaid 10 (Oct .29 & 31) Body Object Project (Chair) pg. 8 Mini Cooper Sketches, Models & Labtime pg. 12 PT Cruiser pg. 16 Segway pg. 58 KI lectern pg. 106 John Deere tractor 11 (Nov. 5 & 7) Body Object Project (Chair) Lab-time Body Object Project (Chair) Presentations Veterans Day Monday Nov. 12 – No class 12 (Nov 14 Weds) Team Design Project pg. 38 Galaxy Playground system Research and Ideation pg. 42 Neurosmith music toy IDEO video pg. 62 HP workstation pg. 136 Heat blanket pg. 176 Thoughtcaster 13 (Nov. 19 Mon) Design Research Thanksgiving Holiday Wednesday Nov. 21 – No class 14 (Nov. 26 & 28) User Profiles and Requirements Ideation, Brainstorming Methodologies 15 (Dec. 3 & 5) Concept Sketching Presentation Preparation TBD (Dec. 12th or 13th) Wednesday or Thursday 1:00-3:00 Final Exam Due and Team Design Project Presentations Note: the instructor reserves the right to make changes 70 71 KEENE STATE COLLEGE 2007-2008 COURSE PROPOSAL FORM DATE: 2-29-2008 SPONSORING PROGRAM AND CHAIR: Technology, Design and Safety Department Chair: Larry McDonald Phone: 358-2976 Email: lmcdonal@keene.edu PROPOSAL SPONSOR: Richard Foley Phone: 358-2893 Email: rfoley@keene.edu Charles Sheaff Phone: 358- 2887 Email: csheaff@keene.edu TITLE SUMMARY: TDS 252 PRODUCT DESIGN II PROPOSED ACTION: Underline proposed changes. Course Addition Number Change Title Change Credit Change Description Change Prerequisite Change Course Deletion Course Replacement Other:Prefix Change EXISTING (OLD) DATA: This course is the continuation of Product Design I and emulates the product design and development process from start to finish. Projects of increasing complexity are undertaken. Topics include initial product ideas, quality control, prototype fabrication and testing. Two-hour lecture, three-hour lab. Prerequisites: TDS 152 or permission of instructor. Spring. PROPOSED (NEW) COURSE TITLE: SPDI 252 PRODUCT DESIGN II 72 PROPOSED (NEW) COURSE: A continuation of Product Design I, emphasis is on rational methods for developing designs in team settings. Basic engineering methods of analysis are introduced to evaluate design structures and mechanisms. Alternative design options are evaluated using analytical techniques. Project planning fundamentals of time and budget emulate industrial development practices. Spring Prerequisite: SPDI 152 or permission of instructor LEARNING OUTCOMES: Learning Outcomes: After completing this course, students will be able to demonstrate: - Determining and analyzing the fundamental design qualities which will improve product function - Performing design evaluations - Developing ideas and design solutions - Management of design projects to both time and financial budgets. - Analysis to reduce financial and environmental costs of producing the resulting product. - Applying the basic knowledge and skills necessary to effectively participate on industrial design teams. RATIONALE: The new course prefix and description reflect the new SPDI program proposal and the current course content. RESOURCES: Faculty: Norm Fisk, Adjunct No changes in facilities are required Additional library resources: None required at this time. ADVISORY OPINIONS: None Required 73 KEENE STATE COLLEGE Technology, Design and Safety SPDI 252 Product Design II (Spring) Course Information Course Description: A continuation of Product Design I, emphasis is on rational methods for developing designs in team settings. Basic engineering methods of analysis are introduced to evaluate design structures and mechanisms. Alternative design options are evaluated using analytical techniques. Project planning fundamentals of time and budget emulate industrial development practices. Prerequisite: SPDI 152 Product Design I or permission of instructor, Spring, Two-hour lecture, three-hour lab. Instructor: - Norman Fisk, PE email: nfisk@keene.edu phone: KSC - 358-8888 x4205, home - 673-5243 Text: The Mechanical Design Process Ullman, David G., McGraw Hill, 2003 Recommended prior Courses: SPDI 121, Drafting, Sketching and CADD SPDI 180, Metal Processes & Prototyping MATH 120, Applied Algebra & Trigonometry, INPHYS 141, College Physics I or INPHYS 241 University Physics Product Design II is a continuation of Product Design I. This course will focus on development of strong design foundation and creating a formal design package from which to fabricate their project. The design creation and refining strategies studied in Product Design I will be used to complete the Product Design II requirements. Each student will individually develop a design proposal for Product Design II. Assistance to complete each individual project may be recruited from other class members. Contributions made to projects of other students will count as extra credit. After designs are completed several proposals will be selected to be fabricated. Course Objectives: Students will have an opportunity to gain knowledge and skills through the following: - Applying the basic knowledge and skills necessary to participate on industrial design teams. - Determining and analyzing the fundamental design qualities which will improve product function - Analysis to reducing financial and environmental costs for producing the resulting product. 74 SPDI 252 Learning Outcomes: After completing this course, students will be able to demonstrate: - Participating effectively on a design team - Performing design evaluations, - Developing ideas and design solutions - Management of design projects to both time and financial budgets. Course Grading: 15% Attendance (arrive on time and work on projects for entire class) 30% Homework assignments and Quizzes (Clarify Objectives, Establish Functions, Setting Requirements, Determining Characteristics, Generating Alternatives, Evaluating Alternatives, Improving Details) 25% Project Refinement, Fabrication, & Presentation ( Journal, Plan/ Budget, Documentation, Presentation) 30% Exams (MIDTERM & FINAL) Assignments will be marked down one grade for each class late, up to ½ off. Class Schedule: (8:00am – 11:50am ) Friday - Room: Adams Technology 012 wk 1 1/21 Class overview – Explanation of Design Project – Start research for existing jar openers. Begin Objectives Tree assignment (reference Chapter 5) wk 2 1/28 Hand-in and review Objectives Tree Assignment with research for existing products. Establish the functions required for your project and set the system boundaries. (Functional Analysis, (Chapter 6) wk 3 2/4 Hand-in and review Functional Analysis Assignment. Start construction of a performance specification for your project. (Chapter 7) wk 4 2/11 Hand-in and review Performance Specification Assignment. Start assignment to determine engineering characteristics which satisfy your “customer requirements”. Complete a Quality Functional Deployment exercise for this assignment. (Chapter8) wk 5 2/18 Hand-in and review your Quality Function Deployment Assignment. Generate possible alternatives to be considered for your design, by constructing a Morphological Chart. (Chapter 9) wk 6 2/25 Hand-in and review your Morphological Chart Assignment. Evaluate your alternatives with the Weighted Objectives Method. (Chapter 10) wk 7 3/4 Hand-in and review your Weighted Objectives Assignment. Presentations of projects to class. Select design projects for manufacture. Select projects to fabricate. wk 8 3/11 MIDTERM EXAM 3/18 SPRING BREAK wk 9 3/25 Fabricate Project wk 10 4/1 Fabricate Project wk 11 4/8 Fabricate Project 75 SPDI 252 wk 12 4/15 Fabricate Project wk 13 4/22 Fabricate Project wk 14 4/29 Wrap-up Projects - Review for FINAL EXAM wk 15 5/6 Present completed projects to class (8:00am – 9:30am) FINAL EXAM - Adams 012 – 9:50am – 11:50am Attendance: Important information is presented and discussed during class sessions making attendance very important. Class (Lab) time will be given to complete assignments in the product design lab. Additional time outside of class will be needed to complete assignments. No make-ups on Presentations will be given without proof of the necessity of the absence (a physician’s note) Unexcused absences will affect your final grade. Come to class and enjoy your learning experience. Lab Procedures: Safety glasses must be worn at all times while working in the lab, this will be strictly enforced. If you are in anyway unsure as to the operation of a particular machine do not try and use it, ask for assistance. You must be checked out on a particular machine before you can use it. At the end of each Lab period, all tools and equipment and projects must be put back in their appropriate places. Any machines and work areas used must be picked up, swept and/or vacuumed before the student leaves the lab. Points will be deducted from your grade for not cleaning up your work area the PD Shop. Academic Honesty: “The pleasures and sense of accomplishment in doing original scholarship are central to the college experience.” “An academic institution is built upon certain fundamental principles, one of which is the principle of independent work, except when collaborative effort is accepted or required. Keene State College affirms the principle of academic integrity that any work, presented as a student’s own must indeed, be that student’s work, created by that student without unacknowledged aid or sources. Any violation of this principle strikes at the very heart of the academic enterprise and will be dealt with as a serious breach of conduct.” Please reference the full college policy on academic honesty in the KSC catalog or on this web page: http://www.keene.edu/catalog/acadpolicies.cfm#22 Disability Students with disabilities who may need classroom accommodations Accommodations: are encouraged to make an appointment with Jane Warner jwarner@keene.edu in the Office of Disability Services (8-2353). It is entirely your responsibility to contact the ODS and concurrently supply me with your Faculty Notification Accommodation letter, which will inform me exactly what accommodations to which you are entitled. This way I can support and assist you in meeting the goals of the course. See the websites for more info. http://www.keene.edu/disabilitysvs/ http://www.keene.edu/aspire/ http://www.keene.edu/counseling/ 76 77 KEENE STATE COLLEGE 2007-2008 COURSE PROPOSAL FORM DATE: 2-29-2008 SPONSORING PROGRAM AND CHAIR: Technology, Design and Safety Department Chair: Larry McDonald Phone: 358-2976 Email: lmcdonal@keene.edu PROPOSAL SPONSOR: Richard Foley Phone: 358-2893 Email: rfoley@keene.edu Charles Sheaff Phone: 358- 2887 Email: csheaff@keene.edu TITLE SUMMARY: TDS 270 WOODWORKING PROCESSES PROPOSED ACTION: Underline proposed changes. Course Addition Number Change Title Change Credit Change Description Change Prerequisite Change Course Deletion Course Replacement Other:Prefix Change EXISTING (OLD) DATA: TDS 270 WOODWORKING PROCESSES The design, production, and finishing of furniture, cabinets, and millwork. The historical development of cabinetry as well as contemporary material and processes are covered. Exploration of advanced woodworking processes in the laboratory. 2 hour lecture. 2 hour lab. Prerequisite: TDS 170 PROPOSED (NEW) COURSE TITLE: SPDI 270 WOODWORKING PROCESSES 78 PROPOSED (NEW) COURSE: The design, production, and finishing of furniture, cabinets, and millwork. The historical development of cabinetry as well as contemporary material and processes are covered. Exploration of advanced woodworking processes in the laboratory. 2 hour lecture. 3 hour lab. Fall, Spring Prerequisite: SPDI 170 or permission of instructor. LEARNING OUTCOMES: No change RATIONALE: The new course prefix reflects the new SPDI program proposal and the prerequisite change. RESOURCES: Faculty: Charles Sheaff, Tenured Professor No changes in facilities are required Additional library resources: None required at this time. ADVISORY OPINIONS: None Required 79 KEENE STATE COLLEGE Technology, Design and Safety SPDI 270-01 Woodworking Processes Course Information Fall or Spring COURSE The design, production, and finishing of furniture, DESCRIPTION: cabinets, and millwork. The historical development of cabinetry as well as contemporary material and processes are covered. Exploration of advanced woodworking processes in the laboratory. 2 hour lecture. 3 hour lab. Prerequisite: SPDI 170 or permission of instructor FACULTY: Dr. Charles A. Sheaff, Professor Office: BTR 218 Tel. 358-2887 Email: csheaff@keene.edu OFFICE HOURS: Monday and Tuesday, 11:00AM-1200 noon Wednesday 8:00-9:00 am Other times by appointment CLASS Lecture/Lab: Monday, 4:30- 9:30 PM BTR 101 SESSIONS: BTR 114 COURSE Upon completion of this course the student will: GOALS: -Be familiar with the safe use of hand and power tools used in cabinetmaking. ‐Gain experience in the various woodworking processes used to construct furniture and cabinetry. ‐have an understanding of the characteristics of wood which make it a unique building material for furniture and cabinetry. ‐Be able to identify the common species of wood used to construct furniture and cabinets. ‐Become familiar with finishing procedures used on furniture and woodwork. TEXTBOOK: Required: Hoadley, Bruce, Understanding Wood, Taunton Press, 2000. Recommended: Wagner / Kicklighter, Modern Woodworking, Goodheart-Wilcox Co.,Inc., 2000 80 READING Listed on the assignment sheet by topics in the text. ASSIGNMENTS: Need to be read prior to class sessions. At the beginning of each Tuesday class, a short quiz will be given on the assigned reading. LAB WORK: This is the level in which the most time is available to construct a major woodworking project. Prior to beginning the project a working drawing and bill of materials must be completed. A project should be carefully chosen, and designed to be completed (including finishing) by the end of the semester. Each student will be required to maintain a daily log of their laboratory activities. This will be kept in the student’s portfolio folder, entries for the week due at the conclusion of the lab session on Thursdays. ATTENDANCE: For lectures and labs: Expected and desirable. Important course information is presented during these periods, many times relating to safety and the operation of machines. For exams: Absolutely mandatory. Proof of necessity of absence (physician's note) required before allowing to make up examination. Attendance will be taken at the conclusion of all lab sessions. ACADEMIC HONESTY STATEMENT: An academic institution is built upon certain fundamental principles, one of which is the principle of independent work, except when collaborative effort is accepted or required. Keene State college affirms the principle of academic integrity that any work presented as a student's own must, indeed, be that student's work, created by that student without unacknowledged aid or sources. Any violation of this principle strikes at the very heart of the academic enterprise and will be dealt with as a serious breach of conduct. DISABILITY STATEMENT: Students with disabilities who may need classroom accommodations are encouraged to make an appointment with Jane Warner or Jessica Bigaj in the Office of Disability Services (x2353). Please meet with me during office hours so that we can collaborate with the Office of Disability Services to provide the appropriate accommodations and supports to assist you in meeting the goals of the course. 81 FINAL Computed as follows: GRADES: Quizzes 12@25 points each 300 Project Work 400 Assigned Laboratory Projects 200 Attendance and Class Participation 100 1000 points Letter grades assigned: 1000 - 930 A 929 - 880 A/B 879 - 830 B 829 - 780 B/C 779 - 730 C 729 - 680 C/D 679 - 600 D Below 599 F 82 KEENE STATE COLLEGE TECHNOLOGY, DESIGN & SAFETY SPDI 270 WOODWORKING PROCESSES ASSIGNMENTS INSTRUCTOR: DR. CHARLES SHEAFF WEEK TOPIC READING ASSIGNMENTS Hoadley 1 Class introduction, Lab Assignment #1 2 The Nature of Wood 1 3 Figure in Wood 2 4 The Woodworker’s Raw Materials 13-16 5 Wood Identification 3 6 Properties of Wood 4-5 7 Water and Wood 6 8 Coping with Dimensional Change 7 in Wood 9 Drying Wood 8 10 Machining and Bending Wood 9 11 Joining Wood 10 12 Adhesives and Gluing 11 13 Finishing and Protecting Wood 12 14 Finding Wood (no quiz) 17 83 TDS 270 WOODWORKING PROCESSES PROJECT EVALUATION Student Name ____________________________________________________ Project Description: _______________________________________________ NOTES: 1) Must be submitted with Bill of Materials and Plans 2) Scores followed by a "T" are used for Turning Projects Possible Self Instructor Score Evaluation Evaluation I. PLANS and BILL OF MATIERALS A. Design 10 __ B. Quality 10 C. Comprehensive 10 II. JOINERY A. Accuracy Overall 30 B. Type of Joints 30 (10T) C. Quality of Joints 40 (10T) D. Tools Used Safely 30 III. SHAPING A. Accuracy 20 (45T) B. Quality 20 (45T) IV. FINISH A. Finish Sanding 40 B. Type and Quality of Finish 40 V. COMPLETION A. Project Completion 50 VI. OVERALL APPEARANCE A. Proportions, Balance, etc. 20 VII. PROJECT WORK ACCOMPLISHED CONSIDERING RESOURCES AVAILABLE (LAB TIME, MATERIALS, ETC.) 50 TOTALS 40 COMMENTS: 84 85 KEENE STATE COLLEGE 2007-2008 COURSE PROPOSAL FORM DATE: 2-29-2008 SPONSORING PROGRAM AND CHAIR: Technology, Design and Safety Department Chair: Larry McDonald Phone: 358-2976 Email: lmcdonal@keene.edu PROPOSAL SPONSOR: Richard Foley Phone: 358-2893 Email: rfoley@keene.edu Charles Sheaff Phone: 358- 2887 Email: csheaff@keene.edu TITLE SUMMARY: TDS 352 PRODUCT DESIGN III PROPOSED ACTION: Underline proposed changes. Course Addition Number Change Title Change Credit Change Description Change Prerequisite Change Course Deletion Course Replacement Other:Prefix Change EXISTING (OLD) DATA: TDS 352 PRODUCT DESIGN III This course is the third in the Product Design series. Specific design projects are undertaken which require an advanced knowledge of computer-aided Design/Manufacturing. Topics include initial product design, product specifications, prototype fabrication, and evaluation. Two-hour lecture, three-hour lab. Prerequisite: TDS 252 or permission of instructor. Fall. PROPOSED (NEW) COURSE TITLE: SPDI 352 PRODUCT DESIGN III 86 PROPOSED (NEW) COURSE: This course is the third in the Product Design series. Specific design projects are undertaken which require an advanced knowledge of computer-aided Design/Manufacturing. Topics include initial product design, product specifications, prototype fabrication, and evaluation. Two-hour lecture, three-hour lab. Prerequisites: SPDI 252 and SPDI 221or permission of instructor. Fall. LEARNING OUTCOMES: Learning Outcomes: After completing this course, students will be able to demonstrate: - Synthesizing design and human factors research into design requirements, design concepts through to working prototypes - Applying human factors, form, materials & manufacturing processes into product design decisions. - Completed product design projects including documenting design development, preparing mechanical drawings, and constructing prototypes in a portfolio. - Engagement in service learning experiences - Generated product ideas for projects or open ended product design challenges while working through design research, ideation, detail design and prototyping. - Use state of the art digital technology including CADD and rapid prototyping methods, work through proof of concept to redesign for ease of manufacture, assembly and disassembly. - Engage in a framework of interdisciplinary and cross disciplinary team building - Complete product design projects including documenting design development, preparing mechanical drawings, and constructing prototypes. - Connect design projects interdisciplinary sustainability issues like producer responsibility (product take-back) and community empowerment through the product/service/business model. RATIONALE: The new course prefix supports the new SPDI program proposal. The course SPDI 221 Three Dimensional CADD has been added as a prerequisite. The skills acquired in SPDI 221 are required to successfully complete the design projects in SPDI 352. RESOURCES: Faculty: Lisa Hix, Full Time Adjunct No changes in facilities are required Additional library resources: None required ADVISORY OPINIONS: None Required 87 KEENE STATE COLLEGE Technology, Design and Safety SPDI 352 Product Design III (Fall) Course Information Course Description: This course is the Third in the Product Design series. Specific design projects will be undertaken which require an advanced knowledge of Computer-aided Design and Manufacturi

Source

Senate Curriculum Committee

Language

English

Publisher

Keene State College

SPDI KSC Program Proposal Final 4-23-08

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