Presentation Title

Predators on the Prowl: A Study of Wildlife in the City of Keene

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

School

School of Sciences and Social Sciences

Discipline

Biology

Mentor

Kenneth Bergman

Date & Time

April 9th at 9 AM - 10 AM

Location

David F. Putnam Science Center, Room 282

Abstract

The dual purposes of our study are to document the use of a developed
landscape during winter by wildlife, particularly mid-sized mammalian predators, and to inform decisions about land development and habitat preservation in Keene
and on our campus. We used trail cameras to demonstrate the presence of
multiple species on or near KSC property and on conservation lands embedded in the settled parts of Keene. Visiting these cameras at regular intervals for
maintenance and data collection, we monitored animal movements across
potential habitat corridors, especially woodlands flanking the Ashuelot River and
Tenant Swamp. We stationed cameras at intervals along the river to investigate
directions of travel. We confirm that animal movement is influenced by
time of day and that the frozen river serves as a platform for some animal movement. Initial observations reveal that species such as foxes, coyotes, and bobcats frequent various sites along the Ashuelot River.

Grant Funded

1

Type of Grant

Student Grant

Grant Name

KSC UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH AND CREATIVE PROJECTS GRANTS

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Apr 9th, 9:00 AM

Predators on the Prowl: A Study of Wildlife in the City of Keene

David F. Putnam Science Center, Room 282

The dual purposes of our study are to document the use of a developed
landscape during winter by wildlife, particularly mid-sized mammalian predators, and to inform decisions about land development and habitat preservation in Keene
and on our campus. We used trail cameras to demonstrate the presence of
multiple species on or near KSC property and on conservation lands embedded in the settled parts of Keene. Visiting these cameras at regular intervals for
maintenance and data collection, we monitored animal movements across
potential habitat corridors, especially woodlands flanking the Ashuelot River and
Tenant Swamp. We stationed cameras at intervals along the river to investigate
directions of travel. We confirm that animal movement is influenced by
time of day and that the frozen river serves as a platform for some animal movement. Initial observations reveal that species such as foxes, coyotes, and bobcats frequent various sites along the Ashuelot River.