Presentation Title

Isolation and Confirmation of Vibrio Species from the Great Bay Estuary of New Hampshire

Presenter Information

Katherine A. KileyFollow

Presentation Type

Poster

School

School of Sciences and Social Sciences

Discipline

Biology

Mentor

Loren Launen

Date & Time

April 9th at 4:15 PM - 5:30 PM

Location

L. P. Young Student Center, West Dining and Flag Room

Abstract

Vibrio species are bacteria found in coastal marine waters that can be harmful to humans. In particular, there are three species that cause health problems in people, Vibrio vulnificus, Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Each of these species causes different medical issues, with V. vulnificus being the most detrimental of these species. The ultimate goal of studying these bacteria is to discover why they have become more prominent in local waters in recent years, by monitoring bacterial levels and environmental parameters that may affect levels. We study these bacteria by isolating them to determine the species and to test isolated strains for potential pathogenicity. Of the 220 isolates collected from the Great Bay Estuary, 35 were V. vulificus. However, none of these tested positive for the pathogenicity gene viu-B. Suggesting that the increased levels of V. vulnificus in Great Bay may not represent a significant human health risk.

Grant Funded

1

Type of Grant

Student Grant

Grant Name

Epscor

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Apr 9th, 4:15 PM

Isolation and Confirmation of Vibrio Species from the Great Bay Estuary of New Hampshire

L. P. Young Student Center, West Dining and Flag Room

Vibrio species are bacteria found in coastal marine waters that can be harmful to humans. In particular, there are three species that cause health problems in people, Vibrio vulnificus, Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Each of these species causes different medical issues, with V. vulnificus being the most detrimental of these species. The ultimate goal of studying these bacteria is to discover why they have become more prominent in local waters in recent years, by monitoring bacterial levels and environmental parameters that may affect levels. We study these bacteria by isolating them to determine the species and to test isolated strains for potential pathogenicity. Of the 220 isolates collected from the Great Bay Estuary, 35 were V. vulificus. However, none of these tested positive for the pathogenicity gene viu-B. Suggesting that the increased levels of V. vulnificus in Great Bay may not represent a significant human health risk.