Presentation Title

It's Alive! : Frankenstein and the Birth of the Tragic Monster

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

School

School of Arts and Humanities

Discipline

Film Studies

Mentor

Debra White-Stanley

Date & Time

April 9th at 4:15 PM - 5:30 PM

Location

L. P. Young Student Center, West Dining and Flag Room

Abstract

Universal's horror classic Frankenstein set the template for the classic monster based on its stunning cinematography, lavish set design and thought-provoking themes. Most audiences instantly refer to the 1931 feature film version of the story rather than the novel written by Mary Shelley, from which its based, due to the film's iconic stature. From the foreboding opening, Frankenstein delves into an abyss of dark shadows and atmoshpheric sets. All of this transitions into a cautionary tale of man ovestepping the boundaries of nature which culminates to the birth of a disfigured creature of tragic proportions. Following the film's release, movie monsters could be seen as misunderstood, ill-fated beings that are only as destructive as their creators. From giant lizards smashing Tokyo to the sinister slashers that haunt our nightmares, Frankenstein influenced many filmmakers to seek the tragedy of our antagonists.

Sources:

Ashley, Gordon. "The Influence of Frankenstein in Modern Film Making." N.p., 28 July 2007. Web. 08 Dec. 2014.

Brunas, Michael, John Brunas, and Tom Weaver. Universal Horrors: The Studio's Classic Films, 1931-1946. 2nd ed. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1990. Print.

Dick, Bernard F. City of Dreams: The Making and Remaking of Universal Pictures Lexington, KY: U of Kentucky, 1997. Web. 5 Nov. 2014.

Fahy, Thomas Richard. The Philosophy of Horror. Lexington, KY: U of Kentucky, 2010. Print.

Picart, Caroline Joan. Remaking the Frankenstein Myth on Film: Between Laughter and Horror. Albany: State U of New York, 2003. Print.

Prince, Stephen. The Horror Film. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers UP, 2004. Print.

Smith, Angela M. Hideous Progeny: Disability, Eugenics, and Classic Horror Cinema. New York: Columbia UP, 2011. Print.

Spadoni, Robert. Uncanny Bodies: The Coming of Sound Film and the Origins of the Horror Genre. Berkeley: U of California, 2007. Print.

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Apr 9th, 4:15 PM

It's Alive! : Frankenstein and the Birth of the Tragic Monster

L. P. Young Student Center, West Dining and Flag Room

Universal's horror classic Frankenstein set the template for the classic monster based on its stunning cinematography, lavish set design and thought-provoking themes. Most audiences instantly refer to the 1931 feature film version of the story rather than the novel written by Mary Shelley, from which its based, due to the film's iconic stature. From the foreboding opening, Frankenstein delves into an abyss of dark shadows and atmoshpheric sets. All of this transitions into a cautionary tale of man ovestepping the boundaries of nature which culminates to the birth of a disfigured creature of tragic proportions. Following the film's release, movie monsters could be seen as misunderstood, ill-fated beings that are only as destructive as their creators. From giant lizards smashing Tokyo to the sinister slashers that haunt our nightmares, Frankenstein influenced many filmmakers to seek the tragedy of our antagonists.

Sources:

Ashley, Gordon. "The Influence of Frankenstein in Modern Film Making." N.p., 28 July 2007. Web. 08 Dec. 2014.

Brunas, Michael, John Brunas, and Tom Weaver. Universal Horrors: The Studio's Classic Films, 1931-1946. 2nd ed. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1990. Print.

Dick, Bernard F. City of Dreams: The Making and Remaking of Universal Pictures Lexington, KY: U of Kentucky, 1997. Web. 5 Nov. 2014.

Fahy, Thomas Richard. The Philosophy of Horror. Lexington, KY: U of Kentucky, 2010. Print.

Picart, Caroline Joan. Remaking the Frankenstein Myth on Film: Between Laughter and Horror. Albany: State U of New York, 2003. Print.

Prince, Stephen. The Horror Film. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers UP, 2004. Print.

Smith, Angela M. Hideous Progeny: Disability, Eugenics, and Classic Horror Cinema. New York: Columbia UP, 2011. Print.

Spadoni, Robert. Uncanny Bodies: The Coming of Sound Film and the Origins of the Horror Genre. Berkeley: U of California, 2007. Print.