Presentation Title

Video Games and Satisfaction with Life

Presentation Type

Poster

School

School of Sciences and Social Sciences

Discipline

Psychology

Mentor

Brian Green

Date & Time

April 9th at 4:15 PM - 5:30 PM

Location

L. P. Young Student Center, West Dining and Flag Room

Abstract

Over 90% of teenagers have played a video game at least once in their lifetime. Exposure to this media has been tested often for its effects on aggression. However, gamer typology has never been compared or linked to Satisfaction with Life (measured with the Satisfaction with Life Scale). Common belief is that video games reduce a person’s satisfaction with life. A study was conducted to test this relationship. Gamers were rated on scales of dedication to the hobby, sociability, and time played (both per day and per week). These results were then compared to SwLS scores for dedicated social gamers, dedicated asocial gamers, casual social gamers, casual asocial gamers, and non-gamers using regression analysis. There is no correlation between scores on these continuums and the SwLS. This non-finding contradicts common belief, showing that video game use in all of its forms does not improve or damage SwLS. Video games are a hobby, just like anything else.

Grant Funded

1

Type of Grant

Student Grant

Grant Name

Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF)

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Apr 9th, 4:15 PM

Video Games and Satisfaction with Life

L. P. Young Student Center, West Dining and Flag Room

Over 90% of teenagers have played a video game at least once in their lifetime. Exposure to this media has been tested often for its effects on aggression. However, gamer typology has never been compared or linked to Satisfaction with Life (measured with the Satisfaction with Life Scale). Common belief is that video games reduce a person’s satisfaction with life. A study was conducted to test this relationship. Gamers were rated on scales of dedication to the hobby, sociability, and time played (both per day and per week). These results were then compared to SwLS scores for dedicated social gamers, dedicated asocial gamers, casual social gamers, casual asocial gamers, and non-gamers using regression analysis. There is no correlation between scores on these continuums and the SwLS. This non-finding contradicts common belief, showing that video game use in all of its forms does not improve or damage SwLS. Video games are a hobby, just like anything else.