Presentation Title

Synthesis of a Potential Inhibitor of Type IV Prepilin Peptidase with a Reduced Amide Functionality

Presentation Type

Poster

School

School of Sciences and Social Sciences

Discipline

Chemistry

Mentor

Paul Baures

Date & Time

April 9th at 4:15 PM - 5:30 PM

Location

L. P. Young Student Center, West Dining and Flag Room

Abstract

The goal of this project is to prepare a molecule that could potentially block the autoagglutination process of Vibrio cholerae. It has been proposed that preventing this process could be a novel way to treat a V. cholerae infection. Vibrio cholerae is the bacteria responsible for cholera epidemics worldwide. The bacteria is particularly dangerous when it grows to large numbers and clumps together, a process called autoagglutination and one that is responsible for the severe effects of cholera. The focus of the project to date has been on the synthesis of the target molecule. The research has included exploring different pathways to reach the proposed compound and assessing the practicality of each of the options, and these results will be presented. In future research, the completed inhibitor will be tested for its effectiveness against the autoagglutination of V. cholerae.

Grant Funded

1

Type of Grant

Student Grant

Grant Name

Building Excellence in Science and Technology (BEST) Undergraduate Research Program

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Apr 9th, 4:15 PM

Synthesis of a Potential Inhibitor of Type IV Prepilin Peptidase with a Reduced Amide Functionality

L. P. Young Student Center, West Dining and Flag Room

The goal of this project is to prepare a molecule that could potentially block the autoagglutination process of Vibrio cholerae. It has been proposed that preventing this process could be a novel way to treat a V. cholerae infection. Vibrio cholerae is the bacteria responsible for cholera epidemics worldwide. The bacteria is particularly dangerous when it grows to large numbers and clumps together, a process called autoagglutination and one that is responsible for the severe effects of cholera. The focus of the project to date has been on the synthesis of the target molecule. The research has included exploring different pathways to reach the proposed compound and assessing the practicality of each of the options, and these results will be presented. In future research, the completed inhibitor will be tested for its effectiveness against the autoagglutination of V. cholerae.