Presentation Title

Improving the Activity of a Fatty Acid Synthase Inhibitor by Structural Mimicry

Presenter Information

Evan M. DunkleyFollow

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

School

School of Sciences and Social Sciences

Discipline

Chemistry

Mentor

Paul Baures

Date & Time

April 9th at 3:15 PM - 4:15 PM

Location

David F. Putnam Science Center, Room 127

Abstract

There are many types of cancer that depend on a constant supply of fatty acids made by an enzyme known as Fatty Acid Synthase (FAS). It has been proposed that preventing FAS from making fatty acids could be useful in the overall treatment of these cancers. The basis of this project is to mimic molecules used by FAS and thus trick the enzyme into decelerating the production of fatty acids, making it easier to kill cancer cells. Techniques learned in an organic chemistry class such as synthesis, chromatography, and spectroscopy are used to create, purify, and characterize these molecules. Once purified, the molecules are sent to the Norris Cotton Cancer Center to be tested for toxicity to cancer cells, as well as their stability in a living system. More molecules are continuously synthesized as the research progresses and demonstrate improved stability and activity.

Grant Funded

1

Type of Grant

Faculty Grant

Grant Name

IDeA Program, NIH Grant No. P20GM103506

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Apr 9th, 3:15 PM

Improving the Activity of a Fatty Acid Synthase Inhibitor by Structural Mimicry

David F. Putnam Science Center, Room 127

There are many types of cancer that depend on a constant supply of fatty acids made by an enzyme known as Fatty Acid Synthase (FAS). It has been proposed that preventing FAS from making fatty acids could be useful in the overall treatment of these cancers. The basis of this project is to mimic molecules used by FAS and thus trick the enzyme into decelerating the production of fatty acids, making it easier to kill cancer cells. Techniques learned in an organic chemistry class such as synthesis, chromatography, and spectroscopy are used to create, purify, and characterize these molecules. Once purified, the molecules are sent to the Norris Cotton Cancer Center to be tested for toxicity to cancer cells, as well as their stability in a living system. More molecules are continuously synthesized as the research progresses and demonstrate improved stability and activity.