Presentation Title

X-Ray Crystallography of Pharmaceutical Related Molecules with an International Perspective

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

School

School of Sciences and Social Sciences

Discipline

Chemistry

Mentor

Jerry Jasinski

Date & Time

April 9th at 9 AM - 10 AM

Location

David F. Putnam Science Center, Room 181

Abstract

Single-crystal X-ray Diffraction is a non-destructive analytical technique which provides detailed information about the internal molecular lattice of crystalline substances that allows us to view individual atoms that construct a crystal in three dimensional space. To collect data, a crystal is placed on Keene State’s diffractometer which uses X-rays to gather data points where atoms are in space within the crystal. Once completed, the data is transferred to a computer where the data can be solved using different computer programs to view the three dimensional structure of the atom and crystal lattice. This work has been focused on the structural characterization of pharmaceutically significant molecules related to a variety of diseases, and is in collaboration with various research groups from around the world. Over 100 crystals have been collected and solved, and have resulted in five publications. The process, results, and future goals will be presented.

Grant Funded

1

Type of Grant

Student Grant

Grant Name

supported by the BEST (Building Excellence in Science and Technology) 2015 Summer Undergraduate Research Program at Keene State College

Share

COinS
 
Apr 9th, 9:00 AM

X-Ray Crystallography of Pharmaceutical Related Molecules with an International Perspective

David F. Putnam Science Center, Room 181

Single-crystal X-ray Diffraction is a non-destructive analytical technique which provides detailed information about the internal molecular lattice of crystalline substances that allows us to view individual atoms that construct a crystal in three dimensional space. To collect data, a crystal is placed on Keene State’s diffractometer which uses X-rays to gather data points where atoms are in space within the crystal. Once completed, the data is transferred to a computer where the data can be solved using different computer programs to view the three dimensional structure of the atom and crystal lattice. This work has been focused on the structural characterization of pharmaceutically significant molecules related to a variety of diseases, and is in collaboration with various research groups from around the world. Over 100 crystals have been collected and solved, and have resulted in five publications. The process, results, and future goals will be presented.