Presentation Title

The Effects of a Mindfulness Meditation Course on Undergraduate Students: A Multi-Factorial Study

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

School

School of Sciences and Social Sciences

Discipline

Psychology

Mentor

Karen Jennings

Date & Time

April 9th at 2 PM - 3 PM

Location

David F. Putnam Science Center, Room 282

Abstract

Mindfulness and meditation are essential parts of Buddhist philosophy, but in recent decades they have become topics for psychological and neurological research. Mindfulness practices aim to attune individuals to more intentional actions and thoughts, and have a more defined and stronger awareness of themselves and their environment. Studies have shown that mindfulness can be built through mindfulness meditation and through other practices, and can have profound effects on attention, self-regulation, healthy physiological function, and general well-being. This study will look at the effects of a mindfulness meditation course on undergraduate students, in which the students will engage in mindfulness meditation practices. The aim of the study is to examine the effects on their overall mindfulness levels, their focused attention and open awareness abilities, their self-regulation in relation to survival, and physiological effect measured in blood pressure, with the expectation that participation in the meditation course will improve these functions.

Grant Funded

1

Type of Grant

Student Grant

Grant Name

Undergraduate Research Grant

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Apr 9th, 2:00 PM

The Effects of a Mindfulness Meditation Course on Undergraduate Students: A Multi-Factorial Study

David F. Putnam Science Center, Room 282

Mindfulness and meditation are essential parts of Buddhist philosophy, but in recent decades they have become topics for psychological and neurological research. Mindfulness practices aim to attune individuals to more intentional actions and thoughts, and have a more defined and stronger awareness of themselves and their environment. Studies have shown that mindfulness can be built through mindfulness meditation and through other practices, and can have profound effects on attention, self-regulation, healthy physiological function, and general well-being. This study will look at the effects of a mindfulness meditation course on undergraduate students, in which the students will engage in mindfulness meditation practices. The aim of the study is to examine the effects on their overall mindfulness levels, their focused attention and open awareness abilities, their self-regulation in relation to survival, and physiological effect measured in blood pressure, with the expectation that participation in the meditation course will improve these functions.