Presentation Title

Differences in ROS production in BEAS-2B cells exposed to ‘real world’ diesel and biodiesel particulate matter

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

School

School of Sciences and Social Sciences

Discipline

Environmental Studies

Mentor

Nora Traviss

Date & Time

April 9th at 2 PM - 3 PM

Location

David F. Putnam Science Center, Room 163

Abstract

Biodiesel’s demonstrated reduction in particulate matter (PM) from combustion processes has resulted in its widespread acceptance as an alternative fuel to petroleum diesel. Yet, little is known regarding the health impacts from exposure to ‘real world’ biodiesel PM. The chemical composition of biodiesel and diesel PM is variable but consists of elements which generate the production of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in human cells. High ROS levels have been associated with diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders, and cardiovascular diseases. This study assessed the differences in ROS produced by human lung cells exposed to biodiesel and diesel PM collected at a ‘real world’ occupational setting. Additionally, we analyzed the PM for water soluble organic carbon (WSOC). WSOC, the part of the particle that can dissolve in human cells, has been associated with high ROS in some studies of petroleum diesel particles. We investigated the ROS/WSOC relationship in our collected diesel and biodiesel particles. As elevated ROS levels have been associated with multiple diseases, a better understanding of relationship between the composition of biodiesel PM and ROS generation provides insight to its potential impact on human health.

Grant Funded

1

Type of Grant

Faculty Grant

Grant Name

NIH

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Apr 9th, 2:00 PM

Differences in ROS production in BEAS-2B cells exposed to ‘real world’ diesel and biodiesel particulate matter

David F. Putnam Science Center, Room 163

Biodiesel’s demonstrated reduction in particulate matter (PM) from combustion processes has resulted in its widespread acceptance as an alternative fuel to petroleum diesel. Yet, little is known regarding the health impacts from exposure to ‘real world’ biodiesel PM. The chemical composition of biodiesel and diesel PM is variable but consists of elements which generate the production of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in human cells. High ROS levels have been associated with diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders, and cardiovascular diseases. This study assessed the differences in ROS produced by human lung cells exposed to biodiesel and diesel PM collected at a ‘real world’ occupational setting. Additionally, we analyzed the PM for water soluble organic carbon (WSOC). WSOC, the part of the particle that can dissolve in human cells, has been associated with high ROS in some studies of petroleum diesel particles. We investigated the ROS/WSOC relationship in our collected diesel and biodiesel particles. As elevated ROS levels have been associated with multiple diseases, a better understanding of relationship between the composition of biodiesel PM and ROS generation provides insight to its potential impact on human health.