Presentation Title

“What's the buzz?” An analytical investigation of caffeinated beverages and products.

Presentation Type

Poster

School

School of Sciences and Social Sciences

Discipline

Chemistry

Mentor

James Kraly

Date & Time

April 9th at 4:15 PM - 5:30 PM

Location

L. P. Young Student Center, West Dining and Flag Room

Abstract

Caffeinated products have become increasingly prominent in recent years, and many contain an undisclosed amount of caffeine. This project summarizes scientific experiments designed and conducted by students in CHEM 251, who worked together to investigate caffeine concentrations in various beverages and food products. Capillary Electrophoresis was used in an analytical experiment to separate caffeine from other components in the samples and quantitatively determine the amount of caffeine. Students’ projects included the analysis of caffeinated gum, investigating temperature and method for coffee preparation, evaluating steep time of caffeinated teas, and discovering the chemical profile of ‘energy blends’ in energy drinks. Calculated results were compared to stated claims of the manufacturers and evaluated using statistical tools. Quantitative results indicated poor extraction of caffeine from gum, French press brewing methods resulted in the largest caffeine concentrations, and that 15 minutes of tea steeping time results in a plateau of caffeine content.

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Apr 9th, 4:15 PM

“What's the buzz?” An analytical investigation of caffeinated beverages and products.

L. P. Young Student Center, West Dining and Flag Room

Caffeinated products have become increasingly prominent in recent years, and many contain an undisclosed amount of caffeine. This project summarizes scientific experiments designed and conducted by students in CHEM 251, who worked together to investigate caffeine concentrations in various beverages and food products. Capillary Electrophoresis was used in an analytical experiment to separate caffeine from other components in the samples and quantitatively determine the amount of caffeine. Students’ projects included the analysis of caffeinated gum, investigating temperature and method for coffee preparation, evaluating steep time of caffeinated teas, and discovering the chemical profile of ‘energy blends’ in energy drinks. Calculated results were compared to stated claims of the manufacturers and evaluated using statistical tools. Quantitative results indicated poor extraction of caffeine from gum, French press brewing methods resulted in the largest caffeine concentrations, and that 15 minutes of tea steeping time results in a plateau of caffeine content.