Presentation Title

Exploring the Neurodevelopmental Effects of Sublethal Exposure to the Priority Pyrene in the Amphibian Model Xenopus Laevis

Presentation Type

Poster

School

Interdisciplinary Studies

Discipline

Biology

Mentor

Susan Whittemore

Abstract

The common pollutant pyrene (PYR) is known to cross the placenta thus exposing human fetuses in utero. To better understand the potential risk of PYR exposure to the developing nervous system, behavioral assays were preformed on the larvae (stage 49, day 12) of Xenopus laevis. The swimming behavior of larvae continuously exposed to PYR was captured in 10-minute video recordings and analyzed for the following parameters: activity level, distance traveled, spatial use of arena, and speed. Our results reveal that larvae exposed to the highest dosage (2.5 uM) were hyperactive and traveled longer distances than control larvae. We also found a negative correlation between larval growth and activity. In future studies we will be assessing the impact of PYR on the startle responses of larvae. These findings indicate that developmental exposure to PYR may alter normal development of the nervous system.

Grant Funded

1

Type of Grant

Faculty Grant

Grant Name

BEST Grant

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Exploring the Neurodevelopmental Effects of Sublethal Exposure to the Priority Pyrene in the Amphibian Model Xenopus Laevis

The common pollutant pyrene (PYR) is known to cross the placenta thus exposing human fetuses in utero. To better understand the potential risk of PYR exposure to the developing nervous system, behavioral assays were preformed on the larvae (stage 49, day 12) of Xenopus laevis. The swimming behavior of larvae continuously exposed to PYR was captured in 10-minute video recordings and analyzed for the following parameters: activity level, distance traveled, spatial use of arena, and speed. Our results reveal that larvae exposed to the highest dosage (2.5 uM) were hyperactive and traveled longer distances than control larvae. We also found a negative correlation between larval growth and activity. In future studies we will be assessing the impact of PYR on the startle responses of larvae. These findings indicate that developmental exposure to PYR may alter normal development of the nervous system.