Presentation Title

Hey Pretty Thing, How Much?: The Problematic Reality of Catcalling

Presentation Type

Poster

School

School of Arts and Humanities

Discipline

Communication

Mentor

Jeff Halford

Abstract

Hey Pretty Thing, How Much?: The Problematic Reality of Catcalling

Olivia Moore

olivia.moore@ksc.keene.edu

Student ID: 0575152

Jeff Halford

jhalford@keene.edu

This study explores the phenomenon of catcalling, where unwanted sexual attention is communicated through verbal and nonverbal expression. Despite countless studies concerning stranger harassment, limited research extends beyond women's experiences with catcalling. With a mixed-methods approach, this two-part study aims to determine the frequency of experiences and perpetration (Part 1), and perceptions of catcalling (Part 2) among men and women. Results from Part 1 suggest that women experience catcalling at a greater frequency, while men perpetrate catcalling at a greater frequency. As Part 2 delves further into personal experiences of victimization, results indicate common understandings of catcalling reflecting negative perceptions, while surfacing coping methods that are of a passive, benign, self-blame, and active nature. As experience has a direct relationship with perpetration for men and women, results demonstrate not merely an issue of gender; rather this study further reveals that catcalling is an intensifying social problem in contemporary society.

Share

COinS
 

Hey Pretty Thing, How Much?: The Problematic Reality of Catcalling

Hey Pretty Thing, How Much?: The Problematic Reality of Catcalling

Olivia Moore

olivia.moore@ksc.keene.edu

Student ID: 0575152

Jeff Halford

jhalford@keene.edu

This study explores the phenomenon of catcalling, where unwanted sexual attention is communicated through verbal and nonverbal expression. Despite countless studies concerning stranger harassment, limited research extends beyond women's experiences with catcalling. With a mixed-methods approach, this two-part study aims to determine the frequency of experiences and perpetration (Part 1), and perceptions of catcalling (Part 2) among men and women. Results from Part 1 suggest that women experience catcalling at a greater frequency, while men perpetrate catcalling at a greater frequency. As Part 2 delves further into personal experiences of victimization, results indicate common understandings of catcalling reflecting negative perceptions, while surfacing coping methods that are of a passive, benign, self-blame, and active nature. As experience has a direct relationship with perpetration for men and women, results demonstrate not merely an issue of gender; rather this study further reveals that catcalling is an intensifying social problem in contemporary society.