Presentation Title

Optimizing a Fatty Acid Synthase Inhibitor for Possible Application Toward Breast Cancer.

Presentation Type

Poster

School

School of Sciences and Social Sciences

Discipline

Chemistry

Mentor

Paul Baures

Date & Time

April 9th at 4:15 PM - 5:30 PM

Location

L. P. Young Student Center, West Dining and Flag Room

Abstract

Breast cancer, among many other types of cancer, depends on a constant supply of fatty acids made by the enzyme Fatty Acid Synthase (FAS) for fuel, the formation of cell membranes, and for the formation of lipids that stimulate cell growth. FAS is therefore associated with clinically aggressive tumor behavior, tumor-cell growth and survival, and has become a target for chemotherapy development. A previously made molecule has proven to inhibit FAS and block the formation of fatty acids important for cancer cells, but is not stable in blood plasma. This project investigates changes to that compound hypothesized to maintain FAS inhibition while improving the stability of the compound in a living system. If successful, the new compound could be a useful lead to investigate the role of FAS inhibition in animal models of breast cancer. The design, synthesis, purification, and characterization of the new compounds will be presented.

Grant Funded

1

Type of Grant

Faculty Grant

Grant Name

Supported by the IDeA Program, NIH Grant No. P20GM103506, otherwise known as NH-INBRE.

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Apr 9th, 4:15 PM

Optimizing a Fatty Acid Synthase Inhibitor for Possible Application Toward Breast Cancer.

L. P. Young Student Center, West Dining and Flag Room

Breast cancer, among many other types of cancer, depends on a constant supply of fatty acids made by the enzyme Fatty Acid Synthase (FAS) for fuel, the formation of cell membranes, and for the formation of lipids that stimulate cell growth. FAS is therefore associated with clinically aggressive tumor behavior, tumor-cell growth and survival, and has become a target for chemotherapy development. A previously made molecule has proven to inhibit FAS and block the formation of fatty acids important for cancer cells, but is not stable in blood plasma. This project investigates changes to that compound hypothesized to maintain FAS inhibition while improving the stability of the compound in a living system. If successful, the new compound could be a useful lead to investigate the role of FAS inhibition in animal models of breast cancer. The design, synthesis, purification, and characterization of the new compounds will be presented.