Presentation Title

Discrepancies In Cognitive Performance Between Male and Female Collegiate Hockey Players Post-Concussion

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

School

School of Sciences and Social Sciences

Discipline

Psychology

Mentor

Susan Menees

Abstract

Ice hockey players have been shown to experience greater numbers of concussions compared to other contact sport athletes. Furthermore, female athletes have been shown to experience a greater number of and more severe post-concussion symptoms than males. Previously concussed members of the male and female KSC club hockey teams will be given four computerized tests measuring their ability to recognize and respond to rapidly presented images. Student athletes from sports other than hockey who haven’t experienced a concussion will be given the same computerized tests. Findings are expected to show that previously concussed female ice hockey players will have slower response times and lower scores than previously concussed male ice hockey players; and that previously concussed hockey players of both sexes will have slower response times and lower scores than non-concussed student athletes. Results may highlight a need to reexamine how concussions are screened for and treated between sexes.

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Discrepancies In Cognitive Performance Between Male and Female Collegiate Hockey Players Post-Concussion

Ice hockey players have been shown to experience greater numbers of concussions compared to other contact sport athletes. Furthermore, female athletes have been shown to experience a greater number of and more severe post-concussion symptoms than males. Previously concussed members of the male and female KSC club hockey teams will be given four computerized tests measuring their ability to recognize and respond to rapidly presented images. Student athletes from sports other than hockey who haven’t experienced a concussion will be given the same computerized tests. Findings are expected to show that previously concussed female ice hockey players will have slower response times and lower scores than previously concussed male ice hockey players; and that previously concussed hockey players of both sexes will have slower response times and lower scores than non-concussed student athletes. Results may highlight a need to reexamine how concussions are screened for and treated between sexes.