Presentation Title

Supermarket Hand Baskets...Helping or "Hurting" Business

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

School

School of Sciences and Social Sciences

Discipline

Safety & Occupational Health Applied Sciences

Mentor

Yun Sun

Date & Time

April 9th at 10:15 AM - 11:15 AM

Location

David F. Putnam Science Center, Room 163

Abstract

Supermarket Hand Baskets...Helping or "Hurting" Business


By: Lisa Charland

Mentor: Yun Sun

The design of supermarket hand baskets may adversely affect guest comfort and the store’s bottom line. Hand basket use is popular, chosen by guests 41% of the time, compared to traditional cart use at 42%, and small cart use at 17%. Overflowing hand baskets, the use of both hands to carry, and adjusted postures are clues indicating hand baskets may be “hurting” more than helping supermarket business.

Sixty-two hours of observation, conducted at the checkout, revealed overflowing hand baskets occurring 8% of the time, required use of both hands at 10%, and adjusted postures at 32%. Interviews with twenty shoppers revealed their desire for a hand basket with an improved design that would reduce discomfort, consequently resulting in extending their shopping time.

Utilizing an ergonomically designed hand basket, combined with the increased use of under utilized small carts, would potentially enhance the guests’ shopping experience and the business’ bottom line.

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Apr 9th, 10:15 AM

Supermarket Hand Baskets...Helping or "Hurting" Business

David F. Putnam Science Center, Room 163

Supermarket Hand Baskets...Helping or "Hurting" Business


By: Lisa Charland

Mentor: Yun Sun

The design of supermarket hand baskets may adversely affect guest comfort and the store’s bottom line. Hand basket use is popular, chosen by guests 41% of the time, compared to traditional cart use at 42%, and small cart use at 17%. Overflowing hand baskets, the use of both hands to carry, and adjusted postures are clues indicating hand baskets may be “hurting” more than helping supermarket business.

Sixty-two hours of observation, conducted at the checkout, revealed overflowing hand baskets occurring 8% of the time, required use of both hands at 10%, and adjusted postures at 32%. Interviews with twenty shoppers revealed their desire for a hand basket with an improved design that would reduce discomfort, consequently resulting in extending their shopping time.

Utilizing an ergonomically designed hand basket, combined with the increased use of under utilized small carts, would potentially enhance the guests’ shopping experience and the business’ bottom line.