Presentation Title

Investigating How The Abundance Of An Argonaute Family Protein Is Controlled In The Mustard Plant Arabidopsis Thaliana

Presenter Information

Jessica Dude

Mentor

Ross Cocklin

Location

L. P. Young Student Center – Lantern And East Dining Rooms

Abstract

A family of proteins with very similar amino acid sequences known as Argonautes is found in all plants and animals. Proteins from this family play critical roles during an organism’s development and helping the plant or animal fight off harmful viruses. Argonautes carry out these tasks by silencing a specific set of the organism’s own developmental genes as well as genes encoded by viruses, relieving the cell of unnecessary or even harmful genetic codes. This phenomenon of destroying certain genes has immense scientific and pharmaceutical implications. In this set of experiments, we examine one of the ways in which an Argonaute protein’s activity is controlled. We aim to create a system to study the role of the Argonaute4 protein in the mustard plant Arabidopsis thaliana and how its abundance fluctuates in order to meet the changing needs of the plant during its life cycle.

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Apr 11th, 4:15 PM Apr 11th, 5:15 PM

Investigating How The Abundance Of An Argonaute Family Protein Is Controlled In The Mustard Plant Arabidopsis Thaliana

L. P. Young Student Center – Lantern And East Dining Rooms

A family of proteins with very similar amino acid sequences known as Argonautes is found in all plants and animals. Proteins from this family play critical roles during an organism’s development and helping the plant or animal fight off harmful viruses. Argonautes carry out these tasks by silencing a specific set of the organism’s own developmental genes as well as genes encoded by viruses, relieving the cell of unnecessary or even harmful genetic codes. This phenomenon of destroying certain genes has immense scientific and pharmaceutical implications. In this set of experiments, we examine one of the ways in which an Argonaute protein’s activity is controlled. We aim to create a system to study the role of the Argonaute4 protein in the mustard plant Arabidopsis thaliana and how its abundance fluctuates in order to meet the changing needs of the plant during its life cycle.