Presentation Title

Cold Water Immersion Vs. Warm Water Immersion On Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness

Presenter Information

Makayla Clarke
Nicole Gindraux

Mentor

Melanie Adams and Wanda Swiger

Location

David F. Putnam Science Center - 127

Abstract

Muscular injuries are common when performing eccentric exercise. This contraction causes micro-damage to muscles, producing pain associated with delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). The purpose of this study is to determine which prevention method (warm immersion prior or cold immersion post) provides the greatest relief of DOMS-induced pain and loss of strength. Thirty out-of-season Keene State College athletes, ages 17-24 years, will be recruited as participants. Participants will be randomized to two treatment groups: warm immersion prior exercise or cold immersion post. Slow lowering of a dumbbell (eccentric exercise) will be performed with their non-dominant wrist extensors. Pain (visual analog scale) and grip strength (dynamometer) will be recorded at baseline, post-treatment, 24 hours post, and 48 hours post. A RMANOVA will be used to compare groups; significant results will be followed by t-tests. It is hypothesized that heat before exercise will have a greater reduction in DOMS due to changes in muscle extensibility and elasticity.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 11th, 10:20 AM Apr 11th, 11:20 AM

Cold Water Immersion Vs. Warm Water Immersion On Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness

David F. Putnam Science Center - 127

Muscular injuries are common when performing eccentric exercise. This contraction causes micro-damage to muscles, producing pain associated with delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). The purpose of this study is to determine which prevention method (warm immersion prior or cold immersion post) provides the greatest relief of DOMS-induced pain and loss of strength. Thirty out-of-season Keene State College athletes, ages 17-24 years, will be recruited as participants. Participants will be randomized to two treatment groups: warm immersion prior exercise or cold immersion post. Slow lowering of a dumbbell (eccentric exercise) will be performed with their non-dominant wrist extensors. Pain (visual analog scale) and grip strength (dynamometer) will be recorded at baseline, post-treatment, 24 hours post, and 48 hours post. A RMANOVA will be used to compare groups; significant results will be followed by t-tests. It is hypothesized that heat before exercise will have a greater reduction in DOMS due to changes in muscle extensibility and elasticity.