Presentation Title

Exploring The Relationship Between A Child’s Socioeconomic Status, And Their Health Trajectory As An Adult

Presenter Information

Camille Redmond

Mentor

Margaret Henning

Location

L. P. Young Student Center – Lantern And East Dining Rooms

Abstract

Research indicates that socioeconomic status is one of the most powerful risk factors for poor health outcomes. This work focuses on the effect of parental socioeconomic status (SES) on a child’s health by exploring the relationship between a child’s socioeconomic status and their health trajectory as an adult.

This work will expand on research done in Health Science HLSC 285: Health and Society. Peer-reviewed articles between 2008 and 2014 were selected and analyzed to further understand the behavioral, psychological, or physiological pathways that might be linked in the childhood SES experience to adult health outcomes.

The effects of socioeconomic status on children are physiological as well as psychological. Elements of the early life experience associated with poverty become biologically embedded and contribute to poor adult health

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Apr 11th, 4:15 PM Apr 11th, 5:15 PM

Exploring The Relationship Between A Child’s Socioeconomic Status, And Their Health Trajectory As An Adult

L. P. Young Student Center – Lantern And East Dining Rooms

Research indicates that socioeconomic status is one of the most powerful risk factors for poor health outcomes. This work focuses on the effect of parental socioeconomic status (SES) on a child’s health by exploring the relationship between a child’s socioeconomic status and their health trajectory as an adult.

This work will expand on research done in Health Science HLSC 285: Health and Society. Peer-reviewed articles between 2008 and 2014 were selected and analyzed to further understand the behavioral, psychological, or physiological pathways that might be linked in the childhood SES experience to adult health outcomes.

The effects of socioeconomic status on children are physiological as well as psychological. Elements of the early life experience associated with poverty become biologically embedded and contribute to poor adult health