Presentation Title

Olympic Lifting Vs. Plyometric Training: Which Method Is More Effective In Increasing Vertical Jump Height?

Mentor

Jeffrey Timmer

Location

L. P. Young Student Center – Lantern And East Dining Rooms

Abstract

The purpose of this experimental study was to compare two different training protocols, Olympic lifting and plyometric training, and their effect on vertical jump in 8 college-aged males. The vertical jump is a key indicator of athletic performance and lower body power development. It has been shown that both Olympic and plyometric training have increased vertical jump. However, a debate persists on which type of training is more effective. Olympic lifting is a full body exercise using a barbell. Plyometric exercises include ground based bodyweight exercises. Research has shown that Olympic training causes greater increases in vertical jump when compared to plyometric training (Tricoli, et al 2005). However, other research found that both Olympic lifting and plyometric training increased vertical jump, but there was no significant difference between groups (Moore, et al 2005). It is this inconsistency within findings which drives our research.

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Apr 11th, 4:15 PM Apr 11th, 5:15 PM

Olympic Lifting Vs. Plyometric Training: Which Method Is More Effective In Increasing Vertical Jump Height?

L. P. Young Student Center – Lantern And East Dining Rooms

The purpose of this experimental study was to compare two different training protocols, Olympic lifting and plyometric training, and their effect on vertical jump in 8 college-aged males. The vertical jump is a key indicator of athletic performance and lower body power development. It has been shown that both Olympic and plyometric training have increased vertical jump. However, a debate persists on which type of training is more effective. Olympic lifting is a full body exercise using a barbell. Plyometric exercises include ground based bodyweight exercises. Research has shown that Olympic training causes greater increases in vertical jump when compared to plyometric training (Tricoli, et al 2005). However, other research found that both Olympic lifting and plyometric training increased vertical jump, but there was no significant difference between groups (Moore, et al 2005). It is this inconsistency within findings which drives our research.